In this chapter we will consider how the sea is an inexhaustible source of moments of potential minimal poetry (Valsiner, 2017). Starting out with certain considerations regarding the poetic, the ordinary and the sublime in semiotics and the philosophy of art, we treat the poetic as a way of restoring our amazement at things. We are not interested in talking about works of art, but about the experience of the ordinary aesthetic in dealing with two images of the sea, one related to festivities and meetings between the sacred and the profane, and the other associated with the experience of the deterritorialization of the immigrant. Present in most cultures as a great frontier between the human and the divine, the ordinary and the mythological, the known world and the world to be explored, it is almost impossible to look at the sea and not see something sublime. Rarely is the sea simply the sea, in the way that a table may be simply a table (when, for example, we say with no poetry that “the book is on the table”). For the fisherman, the religious woman, the lovers, the immigrant, the sea is always an imagined sea.

Dazzani, M.V., Marsico, G. (2017). Imagined Sea. In O. Lehmann, N. Chaudhary, A. C. Bastos and E. Abbey (Eds). Poetry and Imagined Worlds Palgrave Studies in Creativity and Culture. (pp 209-222), Palgrave Macmillan, Cham https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64858-3_12;

MARSICO, Giuseppina
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2017

Abstract

In this chapter we will consider how the sea is an inexhaustible source of moments of potential minimal poetry (Valsiner, 2017). Starting out with certain considerations regarding the poetic, the ordinary and the sublime in semiotics and the philosophy of art, we treat the poetic as a way of restoring our amazement at things. We are not interested in talking about works of art, but about the experience of the ordinary aesthetic in dealing with two images of the sea, one related to festivities and meetings between the sacred and the profane, and the other associated with the experience of the deterritorialization of the immigrant. Present in most cultures as a great frontier between the human and the divine, the ordinary and the mythological, the known world and the world to be explored, it is almost impossible to look at the sea and not see something sublime. Rarely is the sea simply the sea, in the way that a table may be simply a table (when, for example, we say with no poetry that “the book is on the table”). For the fisherman, the religious woman, the lovers, the immigrant, the sea is always an imagined sea.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4682113
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