The history of the town of Salerno is very eventful, especially during the first half of the twentieth century, when several tools were drafted to guide and regulate the urban growth. The Cavaccini Donzelli's Plan (1922) implements the expansion inland, accentuating the bipolarity ancient city-new city and creates the basis for future interventions of social housing. The project by Camillo Guerra (1931), however, imagines an expansion on the east coast and the birth of a new district on the waterfront extension, beyond the limits imposed by the railway line, to be relocated. The proposal, though not implemented, constitutes a reference for subsequent planning. In fact even the Calza Bini's Plan (1937), not achieved due to the upcoming war, in addition to providing 'thinning out and enlargement' in the historic center by demolition, envisageS an expansion organized by strips parallel to the coast, based on the zoning criteria arising from a social and functional classification. The Reconstruction Plan (1945) drawn up by the Roman architect Alfredo Scalpelli and the next General Plan by Plinio Marconi (1965) dictate the criteria for the development of the contemporary town, with the consequent expansion eastward and the intensive construction of the shoreline. This paper investigates the salient episodes of Salerno urban planning after World War II to reassemble, through detailed analysis of unpublished archival sources, the intricate puzzle of events linked to the drafting and implementation of the two above mentioned plans.

Salerno: i piani dall'utopia alla cementificazione. Alfredo Scalpelli e Plinio Marconi: due "specialisti in materia"

TALENTI, Simona;TEODOSIO, ANNARITA
2017

Abstract

The history of the town of Salerno is very eventful, especially during the first half of the twentieth century, when several tools were drafted to guide and regulate the urban growth. The Cavaccini Donzelli's Plan (1922) implements the expansion inland, accentuating the bipolarity ancient city-new city and creates the basis for future interventions of social housing. The project by Camillo Guerra (1931), however, imagines an expansion on the east coast and the birth of a new district on the waterfront extension, beyond the limits imposed by the railway line, to be relocated. The proposal, though not implemented, constitutes a reference for subsequent planning. In fact even the Calza Bini's Plan (1937), not achieved due to the upcoming war, in addition to providing 'thinning out and enlargement' in the historic center by demolition, envisageS an expansion organized by strips parallel to the coast, based on the zoning criteria arising from a social and functional classification. The Reconstruction Plan (1945) drawn up by the Roman architect Alfredo Scalpelli and the next General Plan by Plinio Marconi (1965) dictate the criteria for the development of the contemporary town, with the consequent expansion eastward and the intensive construction of the shoreline. This paper investigates the salient episodes of Salerno urban planning after World War II to reassemble, through detailed analysis of unpublished archival sources, the intricate puzzle of events linked to the drafting and implementation of the two above mentioned plans.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4682343
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact