Intracellular communication is tightly regulated in both space and time. Spatiotemporal control is important to achieve a high level of specificity in both dimensions. For instance, cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA) attains spatial resolution by interacting with distinct members of the family of A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) that position PKA at specific loci within the cell. To control the cAMP induced signal in time, distinct signal terminators such as phosphodiesterases and phosphatases are often co-localized at the AKAP scaffold. In platelets, high levels of cAMP/cGMP maintain the resting state to allow free circulation. Exposure to collagen, for instance when the vessel is damaged, triggers platelet activation through initiation of the GPVI (glycoprotein VI)/FcRg-chain forming the onset of a plethora of signaling pathways. Consequently overall intra-platelet cAMP and cGMP levels drop, however detail on how PKA, but also cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) respond in relation to their localized signaling scaffolds is currently missing. To investigate this, we employed a quantitative chemical proteomics approach in activated human platelets enabling the specific enrichment of cAMP/cGMP signaling nodes. Our data reveal that within a few minutes several specific PKA and PKG signaling nodes respond significantly to the activating signal, whereas others do not, suggesting a rapid adaption of specific localized cAMP and cGMP pools to the stimulus. Using protein phosphorylation data gathered we touch upon the potential cross-talk between protein phosphorylation and signaling scaffold function as a general theme in platelet spatiotemporal control.

Collagen stimulation of platelets induces a rapid spatial response of cAMP and cGMP signaling scaffolds

MARGARUCCI, LUIGI;
2011

Abstract

Intracellular communication is tightly regulated in both space and time. Spatiotemporal control is important to achieve a high level of specificity in both dimensions. For instance, cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA) attains spatial resolution by interacting with distinct members of the family of A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) that position PKA at specific loci within the cell. To control the cAMP induced signal in time, distinct signal terminators such as phosphodiesterases and phosphatases are often co-localized at the AKAP scaffold. In platelets, high levels of cAMP/cGMP maintain the resting state to allow free circulation. Exposure to collagen, for instance when the vessel is damaged, triggers platelet activation through initiation of the GPVI (glycoprotein VI)/FcRg-chain forming the onset of a plethora of signaling pathways. Consequently overall intra-platelet cAMP and cGMP levels drop, however detail on how PKA, but also cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) respond in relation to their localized signaling scaffolds is currently missing. To investigate this, we employed a quantitative chemical proteomics approach in activated human platelets enabling the specific enrichment of cAMP/cGMP signaling nodes. Our data reveal that within a few minutes several specific PKA and PKG signaling nodes respond significantly to the activating signal, whereas others do not, suggesting a rapid adaption of specific localized cAMP and cGMP pools to the stimulus. Using protein phosphorylation data gathered we touch upon the potential cross-talk between protein phosphorylation and signaling scaffold function as a general theme in platelet spatiotemporal control.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/3140548
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