At the turn of the new millennium the European Union (EU) catapulted into a new economic era. The golden period of the welfare state, as a solution to social inequity, started to lose ground especially in countries traditionally considered as having conservative-corporatist welfare regimes. Gradually the economic burden the welfare state had transformed itself into became too conspicuous for governments to conceal from other EU member states, the global economic scenario, the sharp eyes of the media and community at large. Due to austerity measures, the guarantee of universal access to healthcare which civil society had gained in exchange of votes started to crumble and, as public debts become more grievous, citizens have started giving up hope on politicians’ promises of finding solutions. In this article we pose the question as to whether civil society can merely be acknowledged as playing a role in healthcare, or if the reform measures adopted are demanding that civil society shoulders the responsibility which states seem unable to handle any longer. In the first part of the article the healthcare system in Italy, the third largest economy in the Euro-zone and a welfare system based on solidarity, is presented as a case study of how the principle of universal healthcare has slowly been nibbled at since the 90s. In the second part we argue that Italian civil society, despite a period characterised by a long transition of administrative and healthcare reforms, plays more than a key role in guaranteeing community wellbeing.

Civil Society in the Italian Reformed Healthcare System: A Role or Responsibility?

MANGONE, Emiliana;PACE, ERIKA MARIE
2014

Abstract

At the turn of the new millennium the European Union (EU) catapulted into a new economic era. The golden period of the welfare state, as a solution to social inequity, started to lose ground especially in countries traditionally considered as having conservative-corporatist welfare regimes. Gradually the economic burden the welfare state had transformed itself into became too conspicuous for governments to conceal from other EU member states, the global economic scenario, the sharp eyes of the media and community at large. Due to austerity measures, the guarantee of universal access to healthcare which civil society had gained in exchange of votes started to crumble and, as public debts become more grievous, citizens have started giving up hope on politicians’ promises of finding solutions. In this article we pose the question as to whether civil society can merely be acknowledged as playing a role in healthcare, or if the reform measures adopted are demanding that civil society shoulders the responsibility which states seem unable to handle any longer. In the first part of the article the healthcare system in Italy, the third largest economy in the Euro-zone and a welfare system based on solidarity, is presented as a case study of how the principle of universal healthcare has slowly been nibbled at since the 90s. In the second part we argue that Italian civil society, despite a period characterised by a long transition of administrative and healthcare reforms, plays more than a key role in guaranteeing community wellbeing.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4354453
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