We analyse how chronic overfeeding, by increasing circulating fatty acids, might lead to inflammation, insulin resistance (IR) and injury in the liver. Chronic overfeeding causes an increase in adipose tissue depots and is characterised by an increased presence of hypertrophic adipocytes when adipose tissue expandability is inadequate. Adipocyte hypertrophy is a possible stress condition for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which will activate inflammatory and apoptotic pathways and cause IR in adipose tissue. Insulin-resistant adipocytes, being more lipolytic and less liposynthetic, induce an increase in circulating free fatty acids. Moreover, the strongly compromised secretion/function of the adipocyte hormones, adiponectin and leptin, decreases lipid oxidation, particularly in the liver, causing lipid accumulation, ER stress and IR in hepatocytes. ER stress may lead to reduced very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion and increased lipogenic gene expression despite the presence of IR. These events and reduced lipid oxidation may lead to further hepatic lipid accumulation. When the triglyceride storage capacity of hepatocytes is exceeded, hepatic injury may occur. ER-stressed steatotic hepatocytes activate apoptotic and inflammatory pathways, which trigger IR and the release of chemokines and cytokines, and these, in turn, elicit an increased influx of Kupffer cells (KCs) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) around dying hepatocytes. Soluble mediators, secreted mainly by ER-stressed steatotic hepatocytes and activated KCs, induce the transdifferentiation of HSCs to myofibroblasts, which secrete fibrogenic cytokines and matrix components that trigger fibrosis. In conclusion, chronic lipid overloading due to inadequate fat-storing capacity of adipose tissue can induce hepatic injury when triglyceride storage capacity of hepatocytes is exceeded.

From chronic overfeeding to hepatic injury: role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation

LIONETTI, Lilla';
2011

Abstract

We analyse how chronic overfeeding, by increasing circulating fatty acids, might lead to inflammation, insulin resistance (IR) and injury in the liver. Chronic overfeeding causes an increase in adipose tissue depots and is characterised by an increased presence of hypertrophic adipocytes when adipose tissue expandability is inadequate. Adipocyte hypertrophy is a possible stress condition for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which will activate inflammatory and apoptotic pathways and cause IR in adipose tissue. Insulin-resistant adipocytes, being more lipolytic and less liposynthetic, induce an increase in circulating free fatty acids. Moreover, the strongly compromised secretion/function of the adipocyte hormones, adiponectin and leptin, decreases lipid oxidation, particularly in the liver, causing lipid accumulation, ER stress and IR in hepatocytes. ER stress may lead to reduced very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion and increased lipogenic gene expression despite the presence of IR. These events and reduced lipid oxidation may lead to further hepatic lipid accumulation. When the triglyceride storage capacity of hepatocytes is exceeded, hepatic injury may occur. ER-stressed steatotic hepatocytes activate apoptotic and inflammatory pathways, which trigger IR and the release of chemokines and cytokines, and these, in turn, elicit an increased influx of Kupffer cells (KCs) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) around dying hepatocytes. Soluble mediators, secreted mainly by ER-stressed steatotic hepatocytes and activated KCs, induce the transdifferentiation of HSCs to myofibroblasts, which secrete fibrogenic cytokines and matrix components that trigger fibrosis. In conclusion, chronic lipid overloading due to inadequate fat-storing capacity of adipose tissue can induce hepatic injury when triglyceride storage capacity of hepatocytes is exceeded.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4667797
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