Background The involvement of family members in end-of-life discussion is generally considered critical. Family members want to be present during the last moments of their beloved, even during resuscitation. Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) is on the one side an opportunity for the family members to give a last farewell and may help them to understand the gravity of the situation. The aim of the present narrative review is to provide an overview of the current discussions on FPDR. Material and methods Narrative review of recently published papers on FPDR. Results and Discussion: FPDR has been proposed since 1987. Mostly, family members want to be present during CPR. Studies have shown that nursing staff are more supportive of FPDR than physicians are. Physicians, who do not often support FPDR, believe that FPDR may interfere with resuscitation, may induce psychological trauma, or be the object of legal repercussions. The presence of family members may also alter the performance of resuscitation. Surveys have shown that the majority of persons interviewed wanted their beloved to be present during resuscitation. Conclusions Currently, several international organizations have published statements and guidelines supporting FPDR. There is no clear response if FPDR is always a safe procedure. Moreover, studies investigating FPDR contain various methodological flaws meaning it is difficult to make any definite conclusions.

Family presence during resuscitation: A concise narrative review

De Robertis E
;
Piazza O
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2017

Abstract

Background The involvement of family members in end-of-life discussion is generally considered critical. Family members want to be present during the last moments of their beloved, even during resuscitation. Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) is on the one side an opportunity for the family members to give a last farewell and may help them to understand the gravity of the situation. The aim of the present narrative review is to provide an overview of the current discussions on FPDR. Material and methods Narrative review of recently published papers on FPDR. Results and Discussion: FPDR has been proposed since 1987. Mostly, family members want to be present during CPR. Studies have shown that nursing staff are more supportive of FPDR than physicians are. Physicians, who do not often support FPDR, believe that FPDR may interfere with resuscitation, may induce psychological trauma, or be the object of legal repercussions. The presence of family members may also alter the performance of resuscitation. Surveys have shown that the majority of persons interviewed wanted their beloved to be present during resuscitation. Conclusions Currently, several international organizations have published statements and guidelines supporting FPDR. There is no clear response if FPDR is always a safe procedure. Moreover, studies investigating FPDR contain various methodological flaws meaning it is difficult to make any definite conclusions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4687513
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