Heat remains the dominant microbial/enzyme inactivation technique used in food preservation though its impact on food quality is often at odds with increased consumer demand for minimally processed (MP) products. Traditional heat processes are very successful for microbial and enzyme inactivation but can also cause undesirable protein denaturation, non-enzymatic browning and loss of vitamins/volatile flavour compounds in some food matrices. As a result, the use of traditional heat processes on MP products (which have characteristics such as higher quality and natural) cannot be reduced by compensating with other traditional chemical preservation strategies as these products are also preferred to be additive and preservative free. However, more recently, alternative preservation technologies have been developed (e.g. high hydrostatic pressure (HPP), high voltage pulsed electrical fields (PEF), ultrasound (US), ultraviolet light (UV) and high intensity light pulses (HILP)). These also have the capability to inactive microorganisms and enzymes, but do so by non-thermal means and therefore their use potentially aligns with the MP ethos. Of these technologies, there have been numerous volumes written on HPP, PEF, US and UV but this is the first book which focuses primarily on the use of high intensity light in food processing. It begins by describing UV light but then distinguishes UV from HILP (which is encompasses a much broader light spectrum). It subsequently gives the reader an insight into the generation of HILP, the application of HILP to foods with reference to its impact on microbial inactivation, quality and nutritional parameters. It also explores the efficacy of this technology for microbial inactivation in combination with other technologies in a hurdle approach while also considering the regulatory issues associated with the use of new preservation technologies. Other non-preservation applications are also considered including a comprehensive chapter on the use of this technology in medical environments. The book is targeted at professional food technologists working in the food industry, academic staff members responsible for the delivery of food preservation operations courses and upper-level undergraduates and masters-level students taking degrees in Food Technology or Food Science. The authors are all highly regarded in the field of HILP and have made a significant contribution to knowledge on this field with numerous publications in this technology.

Preface

Gianpiero Pataro
2016

Abstract

Heat remains the dominant microbial/enzyme inactivation technique used in food preservation though its impact on food quality is often at odds with increased consumer demand for minimally processed (MP) products. Traditional heat processes are very successful for microbial and enzyme inactivation but can also cause undesirable protein denaturation, non-enzymatic browning and loss of vitamins/volatile flavour compounds in some food matrices. As a result, the use of traditional heat processes on MP products (which have characteristics such as higher quality and natural) cannot be reduced by compensating with other traditional chemical preservation strategies as these products are also preferred to be additive and preservative free. However, more recently, alternative preservation technologies have been developed (e.g. high hydrostatic pressure (HPP), high voltage pulsed electrical fields (PEF), ultrasound (US), ultraviolet light (UV) and high intensity light pulses (HILP)). These also have the capability to inactive microorganisms and enzymes, but do so by non-thermal means and therefore their use potentially aligns with the MP ethos. Of these technologies, there have been numerous volumes written on HPP, PEF, US and UV but this is the first book which focuses primarily on the use of high intensity light in food processing. It begins by describing UV light but then distinguishes UV from HILP (which is encompasses a much broader light spectrum). It subsequently gives the reader an insight into the generation of HILP, the application of HILP to foods with reference to its impact on microbial inactivation, quality and nutritional parameters. It also explores the efficacy of this technology for microbial inactivation in combination with other technologies in a hurdle approach while also considering the regulatory issues associated with the use of new preservation technologies. Other non-preservation applications are also considered including a comprehensive chapter on the use of this technology in medical environments. The book is targeted at professional food technologists working in the food industry, academic staff members responsible for the delivery of food preservation operations courses and upper-level undergraduates and masters-level students taking degrees in Food Technology or Food Science. The authors are all highly regarded in the field of HILP and have made a significant contribution to knowledge on this field with numerous publications in this technology.
978-163484845-9
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4713248
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