The genomic architecture of functionally important traits is key to understanding the maintenance of reproductive barriers and trait differences when divergent populations or species hybridize. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to study trait architecture in natural hybrids of two ecologically divergent Populus species. We genotyped 472 seedlings from a natural hybrid zone of Populus alba and Populus tremula for genome-wide markers from reduced representation sequencing, phenotyped the plants in common gardens for 46 phytochemical (phenylpropanoid), morphological and growth traits, and used a Bayesian polygenic model for mapping. We detected three classes of genomic architectures: traits with finite, detectable associations of genetic loci with phenotypic variation in addition to highly polygenic heritability; traits with indications for polygenic heritability only; and traits with no detectable heritability. For the first class, we identified genome regions with plausible candidate genes for phenylpropanoid biosynthesis or its regulation, including MYB transcription factors and glycosyl transferases. GWAS in natural, recombinant hybrids represent a promising step towards resolving the genomic architecture of phenotypic traits in long-lived species. This facilitates the fine-mapping and subsequent functional characterization of genes and networks causing differences in hybrid performance and fitness.

Admixture mapping in interspecific Populus hybrids identifies classes of genomic architectures for phytochemical, morphological and growth traits

Castiglione S.;
2019

Abstract

The genomic architecture of functionally important traits is key to understanding the maintenance of reproductive barriers and trait differences when divergent populations or species hybridize. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to study trait architecture in natural hybrids of two ecologically divergent Populus species. We genotyped 472 seedlings from a natural hybrid zone of Populus alba and Populus tremula for genome-wide markers from reduced representation sequencing, phenotyped the plants in common gardens for 46 phytochemical (phenylpropanoid), morphological and growth traits, and used a Bayesian polygenic model for mapping. We detected three classes of genomic architectures: traits with finite, detectable associations of genetic loci with phenotypic variation in addition to highly polygenic heritability; traits with indications for polygenic heritability only; and traits with no detectable heritability. For the first class, we identified genome regions with plausible candidate genes for phenylpropanoid biosynthesis or its regulation, including MYB transcription factors and glycosyl transferases. GWAS in natural, recombinant hybrids represent a promising step towards resolving the genomic architecture of phenotypic traits in long-lived species. This facilitates the fine-mapping and subsequent functional characterization of genes and networks causing differences in hybrid performance and fitness.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4725707
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