Dietary fiber is a nondigestible constituent of vegetal foods, formed by insoluble and soluble dietary fiber. The intake of dietary fiber, especially soluble dietary fiber, is limited and demands researcher's attention. The modification of cereal's dietary fiber, predominantly insoluble fiber, could be one possible solution. The current study evaluated the comparative effects of several thermal treatments on the modification of insoluble dietary fiber in barley and explored their therapeutic potential in vivo against hypercholesterolemia. The two cultivars of barley, Haider-93 and Jau-87, were thermally treated using different techniques, and dietary fiber was extracted. Successively, the intake of these dietary fibers was evaluated for its antilipidemic activity in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats. In the first phase, thermal treatments especially cooking without soaking increased the soluble fiber (68.08%). The roasting all increased the soluble fiber contents, however, at relatively lower rate (53.91%). The results of efficacy study revealed that biochemical parameters in control animals were within the normal clinical ranges, thus appraising the safe status of the experimental diets. The thermally treated barley fiber decreased total cholesterol (12.14%–12.63%), low-density lipoprotein (14.12%–14.85%), and triglycerides (2.25%–4.32%). The study recorded increasing trends for high-density lipoprotein in both normal and hypercholesterolemic rats. In the nutshell, thermal modification of dietary fiber increased the ratio of soluble to insoluble dietary fiber that improved its hypocholesterolemic potential. The thermally treated barley dietary fiber is effective in reducing the lipid profile in Sprague–dawley rats than untreated dietary fiber and, therefore, can be considered as a functional food and ingredient to cope different lifestyle diseases.

Effect of thermally treated barley dietary fiber against hypercholesterolemia

De Feo V.
;
2020

Abstract

Dietary fiber is a nondigestible constituent of vegetal foods, formed by insoluble and soluble dietary fiber. The intake of dietary fiber, especially soluble dietary fiber, is limited and demands researcher's attention. The modification of cereal's dietary fiber, predominantly insoluble fiber, could be one possible solution. The current study evaluated the comparative effects of several thermal treatments on the modification of insoluble dietary fiber in barley and explored their therapeutic potential in vivo against hypercholesterolemia. The two cultivars of barley, Haider-93 and Jau-87, were thermally treated using different techniques, and dietary fiber was extracted. Successively, the intake of these dietary fibers was evaluated for its antilipidemic activity in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats. In the first phase, thermal treatments especially cooking without soaking increased the soluble fiber (68.08%). The roasting all increased the soluble fiber contents, however, at relatively lower rate (53.91%). The results of efficacy study revealed that biochemical parameters in control animals were within the normal clinical ranges, thus appraising the safe status of the experimental diets. The thermally treated barley fiber decreased total cholesterol (12.14%–12.63%), low-density lipoprotein (14.12%–14.85%), and triglycerides (2.25%–4.32%). The study recorded increasing trends for high-density lipoprotein in both normal and hypercholesterolemic rats. In the nutshell, thermal modification of dietary fiber increased the ratio of soluble to insoluble dietary fiber that improved its hypocholesterolemic potential. The thermally treated barley dietary fiber is effective in reducing the lipid profile in Sprague–dawley rats than untreated dietary fiber and, therefore, can be considered as a functional food and ingredient to cope different lifestyle diseases.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4744154
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