Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the result of hepatic fat overload not due to alcohol consumption and potentially evolving to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Fructose is a naturally occurring simple sugar widely used in food industry linked to glucose to form sucrose, largely contained in hypercaloric food and beverages. An increasing amount of evidence in scientific literature highlighted a detrimental effect of dietary fructose consumption on metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, obesity, hepatic steatosis, and NAFLD-related fibrosis as well. An excessive fructose consumption has been associated with NAFLD development and progression to more clinically severe phenotypes by exerting various toxic effects, including increased fatty acid production, oxidative stress, and worsening insulin resistance. Furthermore, some studies in this context demonstrated even a crucial role in liver cancer progression. Despite this compelling evidence, the molecular mechanisms by which fructose elicits those effects on liver metabolism remain unclear. Emerging data suggest that dietary fructose may directly alter the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, including those that increase hepatic fat accumulation or reduce hepatic fat removal. This review aimed to summarize the current understanding of fructose metabolism on NAFLD pathogenesis and progression.

The role of fructose in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: Old relationship and new insights

Rosato V.;Masarone M.;Torre P.;Persico M.
2021

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the result of hepatic fat overload not due to alcohol consumption and potentially evolving to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Fructose is a naturally occurring simple sugar widely used in food industry linked to glucose to form sucrose, largely contained in hypercaloric food and beverages. An increasing amount of evidence in scientific literature highlighted a detrimental effect of dietary fructose consumption on metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, obesity, hepatic steatosis, and NAFLD-related fibrosis as well. An excessive fructose consumption has been associated with NAFLD development and progression to more clinically severe phenotypes by exerting various toxic effects, including increased fatty acid production, oxidative stress, and worsening insulin resistance. Furthermore, some studies in this context demonstrated even a crucial role in liver cancer progression. Despite this compelling evidence, the molecular mechanisms by which fructose elicits those effects on liver metabolism remain unclear. Emerging data suggest that dietary fructose may directly alter the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, including those that increase hepatic fat accumulation or reduce hepatic fat removal. This review aimed to summarize the current understanding of fructose metabolism on NAFLD pathogenesis and progression.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4765550
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