Introduction: Disease recurrence and progression of ovarian cancer is common with the development of platinum-resistant or refractory disease. This is due in large part to the presence of chemo-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor propagation, maintenance, and treatment resistance. We developed a CSCs drug cytotoxicity assay (ChemoID) to identify the most effective chemotherapy treatment from a panel of FDA approved chemotherapies. Methods: Ascites and pleural fluid samples were collected under physician order from 45 consecutive patients affected by 3rd-5th relapsed ovarian cancer. Test results from the assay were used to treat patients with the highest cell kill drugs, taking into consideration their health status and using dose reductions, as needed. A retrospective chart review of CT and PET scans was used to determine patients' outcomes for tumor response, time to recurrence, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: We observed that recurrent ovarian cancer patients treated with high-cell kill chemotherapy agents guided by the CSCs drug response assay had an improvement in the median PFS corresponding to 5.4 months (3rd relapse), 3.6 months (4th relapse), and 3.9 months (5th relapse) when compared to historical data. Additionally, we observed that ovarian cancer patients identified as non-responders by the CSC drug response assay had 30 times the hazard of death compared to those women that were identified as responders with respective median survivals of 6 months vs. 13 months. We also found that ChemoID treated patients on average had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) between -$18,421 and $7,241 per life-year saved (LYS). Conclusions: This study demonstrated improved PFS and OS for recurrent ovarian cancer patients treated with assay-guided chemotherapies while decreasing the cost of treatment.

Clinical relevance of cancer stem cell chemotherapeutic assay for recurrent ovarian cancer

Cortese A.;Mollo A.;
2020

Abstract

Introduction: Disease recurrence and progression of ovarian cancer is common with the development of platinum-resistant or refractory disease. This is due in large part to the presence of chemo-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor propagation, maintenance, and treatment resistance. We developed a CSCs drug cytotoxicity assay (ChemoID) to identify the most effective chemotherapy treatment from a panel of FDA approved chemotherapies. Methods: Ascites and pleural fluid samples were collected under physician order from 45 consecutive patients affected by 3rd-5th relapsed ovarian cancer. Test results from the assay were used to treat patients with the highest cell kill drugs, taking into consideration their health status and using dose reductions, as needed. A retrospective chart review of CT and PET scans was used to determine patients' outcomes for tumor response, time to recurrence, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: We observed that recurrent ovarian cancer patients treated with high-cell kill chemotherapy agents guided by the CSCs drug response assay had an improvement in the median PFS corresponding to 5.4 months (3rd relapse), 3.6 months (4th relapse), and 3.9 months (5th relapse) when compared to historical data. Additionally, we observed that ovarian cancer patients identified as non-responders by the CSC drug response assay had 30 times the hazard of death compared to those women that were identified as responders with respective median survivals of 6 months vs. 13 months. We also found that ChemoID treated patients on average had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) between -$18,421 and $7,241 per life-year saved (LYS). Conclusions: This study demonstrated improved PFS and OS for recurrent ovarian cancer patients treated with assay-guided chemotherapies while decreasing the cost of treatment.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4766678
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