Since there are not standard configurations of the Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems, several types of optics are designed and analyzed. In this paper, the optical performances of a spherical mirror and a commonly used Fresnel lens of the same diameter are compared, highlighting their impact on the CPV system energy performance. First, the absolute and percentual variation trends of optical concentration factor and optical efficiency as function of the distance between each optical system and receiver are analyzed. The concentration levels obtained by means of the spherical mirror are much higher than the Fresnel lens, with maximum values of optical efficiency equal to 72.8% and 24.1%, respectively. The analysis of the concentration reduction due to a solar-tracking failure has also allowed the estimation of the acceptance angle, thus observing that the spherical mirror requires a less accurate solar tracker with respect to the Fresnel lens, especially if a secondary optics is adopted. As for the energy comparison, the spherical mirror allows increase of the Triple-Junction (TJ) cell temperature up to about 65 °C higher than the environmental temperature and to reach an electrical power of about 15 W in correspondence of a concentrated solar radiation of 470 kW/m2. Finally, the deviation between the cumulative electric energy produced by the TJ cell in the cases of correct and incorrect solar tracking and for the configurations with and without secondary optics has been also evaluated for both the optics. The equations experimentally obtained in this paper represent a more accurate tool to describe the physical phenomenon in comparison with the equations theoretically obtained for similar CPV systems. The results can be used to design a real CPV system that adopts a Fresnel lens or a spherical mirror. The equations experimentally obtained in this paper represent a more accurate tool to describe the physical phenomenon in comparison with the equations theoretically obtained for similar CPV systems. The results can be used to design a real CPV system that adopts a Fresnel lens or a spherical mirror.

Experimental Comparison between Spherical and Refractive Optics in a Concentrating Photovoltaic System

RENNO
2021-01-01

Abstract

Since there are not standard configurations of the Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems, several types of optics are designed and analyzed. In this paper, the optical performances of a spherical mirror and a commonly used Fresnel lens of the same diameter are compared, highlighting their impact on the CPV system energy performance. First, the absolute and percentual variation trends of optical concentration factor and optical efficiency as function of the distance between each optical system and receiver are analyzed. The concentration levels obtained by means of the spherical mirror are much higher than the Fresnel lens, with maximum values of optical efficiency equal to 72.8% and 24.1%, respectively. The analysis of the concentration reduction due to a solar-tracking failure has also allowed the estimation of the acceptance angle, thus observing that the spherical mirror requires a less accurate solar tracker with respect to the Fresnel lens, especially if a secondary optics is adopted. As for the energy comparison, the spherical mirror allows increase of the Triple-Junction (TJ) cell temperature up to about 65 °C higher than the environmental temperature and to reach an electrical power of about 15 W in correspondence of a concentrated solar radiation of 470 kW/m2. Finally, the deviation between the cumulative electric energy produced by the TJ cell in the cases of correct and incorrect solar tracking and for the configurations with and without secondary optics has been also evaluated for both the optics. The equations experimentally obtained in this paper represent a more accurate tool to describe the physical phenomenon in comparison with the equations theoretically obtained for similar CPV systems. The results can be used to design a real CPV system that adopts a Fresnel lens or a spherical mirror. The equations experimentally obtained in this paper represent a more accurate tool to describe the physical phenomenon in comparison with the equations theoretically obtained for similar CPV systems. The results can be used to design a real CPV system that adopts a Fresnel lens or a spherical mirror.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4768723
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