Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) drives many fundamental functions in soil equilibria, acting as useful probe to highlight the effect of land management on overall C cycling. The ecological importance of WEOM is emphasized in tropical environments characterized by humid climate and short OC turnover. The low OC concentration and the physical-chemical conditions associated to water dissolved compounds determine an analytical issue for the characterization of WEOM. The present experiment aimed to test the Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy as rapid tool to evaluate the dynamic of WEOM in tropical soils under different Soil Organic Matter (SOM) managements. The influence of SOM composition on WEOM fraction was evaluated in a laboratory incubation of two tropical soils treated with different organic amendments. The superficial layers of forest and sugarcane Ultisol were incubated for one year with 10 mg C g-1 soil of litter from either native tropical forest or sugarcane crop residues. The sugarcane residues promoted a fast increase of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) followed by a subsequent decrease in both soils, whereas the soils amended with forest litter showed DOC dynamics similar to control samples. The DRIFT analysis unveiled changes on the chemical profile of WEOM mainly reflected on the preservation of dissolved hydrophobic compounds. The results indicate the DRIFT technique as an efficient tool to monitor the chemical changes of WEOM f as related to soil use and organic inputs, and to support a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of WEOM in agro-ecological and environmental processes.

Changes on water-extractable organic matter in tropical forest and agricultural soils as detected by DRIFT spectroscopy technique

Mazzei Pierluigi;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) drives many fundamental functions in soil equilibria, acting as useful probe to highlight the effect of land management on overall C cycling. The ecological importance of WEOM is emphasized in tropical environments characterized by humid climate and short OC turnover. The low OC concentration and the physical-chemical conditions associated to water dissolved compounds determine an analytical issue for the characterization of WEOM. The present experiment aimed to test the Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy as rapid tool to evaluate the dynamic of WEOM in tropical soils under different Soil Organic Matter (SOM) managements. The influence of SOM composition on WEOM fraction was evaluated in a laboratory incubation of two tropical soils treated with different organic amendments. The superficial layers of forest and sugarcane Ultisol were incubated for one year with 10 mg C g-1 soil of litter from either native tropical forest or sugarcane crop residues. The sugarcane residues promoted a fast increase of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) followed by a subsequent decrease in both soils, whereas the soils amended with forest litter showed DOC dynamics similar to control samples. The DRIFT analysis unveiled changes on the chemical profile of WEOM mainly reflected on the preservation of dissolved hydrophobic compounds. The results indicate the DRIFT technique as an efficient tool to monitor the chemical changes of WEOM f as related to soil use and organic inputs, and to support a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of WEOM in agro-ecological and environmental processes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4768907
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