With the increasing focus on the construction sector (e.g., following the European Green Deal initiative) with the aim to reduce emissions by 55% by 2030 (compared to 1990 levels), as well as achieve full decarbonisation by 2050, the built environment remains a strategic domain for the R&I (Research and Innovation) agenda. Indeed, the building and construction sector is the main contributor to greenhouse gas emissions (39% of global emissions as of 2018), highlighting the need to start a process of decarbonisation of this sector. The overall reduction in the environmental impact of building materials is achieved by establishing sustainable continuity between the end‐of‐life phase of the building and the production phase of individual building components. In particular, with reference to the end‐of‐life phase of the building (BS EN 15978: 2011), the Minimum Environmental Criteria foresee the preparation of a plan for the disassembly and selective demolition of the building, which allows the reuse or recycling of materials, building components and prefabricated elements used. According to the guidelines of a low-carbon construction design, which takes into account a circular economy, the following thesis deals with a methodological proposal to study “dry” construction systems (wood and steel). In particular, the study intends to reach the development of such an elaboration by carrying out an assessment of the environmental impact of a process of selective disassembly and demolition of steel building systems. The model is developed on the basis of a reading of the level of sustainability of emblematic case studies, appropriately identified, i.e., ‘quality’ architectures, built with ‘dry’ (steel) building systems.

Circular construction process: Method for developing a selective, low co2eq disassembly and demolition plan

Melella R.
;
Di Ruocco G.
;
Sorvillo A.
2021

Abstract

With the increasing focus on the construction sector (e.g., following the European Green Deal initiative) with the aim to reduce emissions by 55% by 2030 (compared to 1990 levels), as well as achieve full decarbonisation by 2050, the built environment remains a strategic domain for the R&I (Research and Innovation) agenda. Indeed, the building and construction sector is the main contributor to greenhouse gas emissions (39% of global emissions as of 2018), highlighting the need to start a process of decarbonisation of this sector. The overall reduction in the environmental impact of building materials is achieved by establishing sustainable continuity between the end‐of‐life phase of the building and the production phase of individual building components. In particular, with reference to the end‐of‐life phase of the building (BS EN 15978: 2011), the Minimum Environmental Criteria foresee the preparation of a plan for the disassembly and selective demolition of the building, which allows the reuse or recycling of materials, building components and prefabricated elements used. According to the guidelines of a low-carbon construction design, which takes into account a circular economy, the following thesis deals with a methodological proposal to study “dry” construction systems (wood and steel). In particular, the study intends to reach the development of such an elaboration by carrying out an assessment of the environmental impact of a process of selective disassembly and demolition of steel building systems. The model is developed on the basis of a reading of the level of sustainability of emblematic case studies, appropriately identified, i.e., ‘quality’ architectures, built with ‘dry’ (steel) building systems.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4769505
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