Considering a noncentrosymmetric pinning texture composed of a square array of triangular holes, the magnetic flux penetration and expulsion are investigated experimentally and theoretically. A direct visualization of the magnetic landscape obtained using a magneto-optical technique on a Nb film is complemented by a multiscale numerical modeling. This combined approach allows the magnetic flux dynamics to be identified from the single flux quantum limit up to the macroscopic electromagnetic response. Within the theoretical framework provided by time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, an estimation of the in-plane current anisotropy is obtained and its dependence with the radius of the curvature of hole vertices is addressed. These simulations show that current crowding plays an important role in channeling the flux motion, favoring hole-to-hole flux hopping rather than promoting interstitial flux displacement in between the holes. The resulting anisotropy of the critical current density gives rise to a distinct pattern of discontinuity lines for increasing and decreasing applied magnetic fields, in sharp contrast to the invariable patterns reported for centrosymmetric pinning potentials. This observation is partially accounted for by the rectification effect, as demonstrated by finite-element modeling. At low temperatures, where magnetic field penetration is dominated by thermomagnetic instabilities, highly directional magnetic flux avalanches with a fingerlike shape are observed to propagate along the easy axis of the pinning potential. This morphology is reproduced by numerical simulations. Our findings demonstrate that anisotropic pinning landscapes and, in particular, ratchet potentials produce subtle modifications to the critical state field profile that are reflected in the distribution of discontinuity lines.

Metamorphosis of discontinuity lines and rectification of magnetic flux avalanches in the presence of noncentrosymmetric pinning forces

Cirillo C.;Attanasio C.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Considering a noncentrosymmetric pinning texture composed of a square array of triangular holes, the magnetic flux penetration and expulsion are investigated experimentally and theoretically. A direct visualization of the magnetic landscape obtained using a magneto-optical technique on a Nb film is complemented by a multiscale numerical modeling. This combined approach allows the magnetic flux dynamics to be identified from the single flux quantum limit up to the macroscopic electromagnetic response. Within the theoretical framework provided by time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, an estimation of the in-plane current anisotropy is obtained and its dependence with the radius of the curvature of hole vertices is addressed. These simulations show that current crowding plays an important role in channeling the flux motion, favoring hole-to-hole flux hopping rather than promoting interstitial flux displacement in between the holes. The resulting anisotropy of the critical current density gives rise to a distinct pattern of discontinuity lines for increasing and decreasing applied magnetic fields, in sharp contrast to the invariable patterns reported for centrosymmetric pinning potentials. This observation is partially accounted for by the rectification effect, as demonstrated by finite-element modeling. At low temperatures, where magnetic field penetration is dominated by thermomagnetic instabilities, highly directional magnetic flux avalanches with a fingerlike shape are observed to propagate along the easy axis of the pinning potential. This morphology is reproduced by numerical simulations. Our findings demonstrate that anisotropic pinning landscapes and, in particular, ratchet potentials produce subtle modifications to the critical state field profile that are reflected in the distribution of discontinuity lines.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4770104
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