Some evidence suggests that high-intensity motor training slows down the severity of spinocerebellar ataxia. However, whether all patients might benefit from these activities, and by which activity, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We provide an update on the effect and limitations of different training programmes in patients with spinocerebellar ataxias. Overall, data converge of the finding that intensive training is still based either on conventional rehabilitation protocols or whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). Notwithstanding the limitations, short-term improvement is observed, which tends to be lost once the training is stopped. Exergames and virtual reality can ameliorate balance, coordination, and walking abilities, whereas the efficacy of adapted physical activity, gym, and postural exercises depends on the disease duration and severity. In conclusion, although a disease-modifying effect has not been demonstrated, constant, individually tailored, high-intensity motor training might be effective in patients with degenerative ataxia, even in those with severe disease. These approaches may enhance the remaining cerebellar circuitries or plastically induce compensatory networks. Further research is required to identify predictors of training success, such as the type and severity of ataxia and the level of residual functioning.

Update on intensive motor training in spinocerebellar ataxia: time to move a step forward?

Bramanti A.
2019

Abstract

Some evidence suggests that high-intensity motor training slows down the severity of spinocerebellar ataxia. However, whether all patients might benefit from these activities, and by which activity, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We provide an update on the effect and limitations of different training programmes in patients with spinocerebellar ataxias. Overall, data converge of the finding that intensive training is still based either on conventional rehabilitation protocols or whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). Notwithstanding the limitations, short-term improvement is observed, which tends to be lost once the training is stopped. Exergames and virtual reality can ameliorate balance, coordination, and walking abilities, whereas the efficacy of adapted physical activity, gym, and postural exercises depends on the disease duration and severity. In conclusion, although a disease-modifying effect has not been demonstrated, constant, individually tailored, high-intensity motor training might be effective in patients with degenerative ataxia, even in those with severe disease. These approaches may enhance the remaining cerebellar circuitries or plastically induce compensatory networks. Further research is required to identify predictors of training success, such as the type and severity of ataxia and the level of residual functioning.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4771555
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