Nowadays, mobile applications (a.k.a., apps) are used by over two billion users for every type of need, including social and emergency connectivity. Their pervasiveness in today's world has inspired the software testing research community in devising approaches to allow developers to better test their apps and improve the quality of the tests being developed. In spite of this research effort, we still notice a lack of empirical studies aiming at assessing the actual quality of test cases developed by mobile developers: this perspective could provide evidence-based findings on the current status of testing in the wild as well as on the future research directions in the field. As such, we performed a large-scale empirical study targeting 1,780 open-source Android apps and aiming at assessing (1) the extent to which these apps are actually tested, (2) how well-designed are the available tests, and (3) what is their effectiveness. The key results of our study show that mobile developers still tend not to properly test their apps. Furthermore, we discovered that the test cases of the considered apps have a low (i) design quality, both in terms of test code metrics and test smells, and (ii) effectiveness when considering code coverage as well as assertion density.

Testing of mobile applications in the wild: A large-scale empirical study on android apps

Pecorelli F.
;
Catolino G.;Ferrucci F.;De Lucia A.;Palomba F.
2020

Abstract

Nowadays, mobile applications (a.k.a., apps) are used by over two billion users for every type of need, including social and emergency connectivity. Their pervasiveness in today's world has inspired the software testing research community in devising approaches to allow developers to better test their apps and improve the quality of the tests being developed. In spite of this research effort, we still notice a lack of empirical studies aiming at assessing the actual quality of test cases developed by mobile developers: this perspective could provide evidence-based findings on the current status of testing in the wild as well as on the future research directions in the field. As such, we performed a large-scale empirical study targeting 1,780 open-source Android apps and aiming at assessing (1) the extent to which these apps are actually tested, (2) how well-designed are the available tests, and (3) what is their effectiveness. The key results of our study show that mobile developers still tend not to properly test their apps. Furthermore, we discovered that the test cases of the considered apps have a low (i) design quality, both in terms of test code metrics and test smells, and (ii) effectiveness when considering code coverage as well as assertion density.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4775068
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