The hypothalamus–pituitary–testis axis controls the production of spermatozoa, and the kisspeptin system, comprising Kiss1 and Kiss1 receptor (Kiss1R), is the main central gatekeeper. The activity of the kisspeptin system also occurs in testis and spermatozoa, but currently the need of peripheral kisspeptin to produce gametes is not fully understood. Hence, we characterized kisspeptin system in rat spermatozoa and epididymis caput and cauda and analyzed the possible presence of Kiss1 in the epididymal fluid. The presence of Kiss1 and Kiss1R in spermatozoa collected from epididymis caput and cauda was evaluated by Western blot; significant high Kiss1 levels in the caput (p < 0.001 vs. cauda) and constant levels of Kiss1R proteins were observed. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the localization of Kiss1R in sperm head shifts from the posterior region in the epididymis caput to perforatorium in the epididymis cauda. In spermatozoa-free epididymis, Western blot revealed higher expression of Kiss1 and Kiss1R in caput (p < 0.05 vs. cauda). Moreover, immunohistochemistry revealed that Kiss1 and Kiss1R proteins were mainly localized in the secretory epithelial cell types and in contractile myoid cells, respectively. Finally, both dot blot and Elisa revealed the presence of Kiss1 in the epididymal fluid collected from epididymis cauda and caput, indicating that rat epididymis and spermatozoa possess a complete kisspeptin system. In conclusion, we reported for the first time in rodents Kiss1R trafficking in spermatozoa during the epididymis transit and Kiss1 measure in the epididymal fluid, thus suggesting a possible role for the system in spermatozoa maturation and storage within the epididymis.

Differential Expression of Kisspeptin System and Kisspeptin Receptor Trafficking during Spermatozoa Transit in the Epididymis

D'Auria R.;Marino M.;Viggiano A.;Santoro A.
;
2022

Abstract

The hypothalamus–pituitary–testis axis controls the production of spermatozoa, and the kisspeptin system, comprising Kiss1 and Kiss1 receptor (Kiss1R), is the main central gatekeeper. The activity of the kisspeptin system also occurs in testis and spermatozoa, but currently the need of peripheral kisspeptin to produce gametes is not fully understood. Hence, we characterized kisspeptin system in rat spermatozoa and epididymis caput and cauda and analyzed the possible presence of Kiss1 in the epididymal fluid. The presence of Kiss1 and Kiss1R in spermatozoa collected from epididymis caput and cauda was evaluated by Western blot; significant high Kiss1 levels in the caput (p < 0.001 vs. cauda) and constant levels of Kiss1R proteins were observed. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the localization of Kiss1R in sperm head shifts from the posterior region in the epididymis caput to perforatorium in the epididymis cauda. In spermatozoa-free epididymis, Western blot revealed higher expression of Kiss1 and Kiss1R in caput (p < 0.05 vs. cauda). Moreover, immunohistochemistry revealed that Kiss1 and Kiss1R proteins were mainly localized in the secretory epithelial cell types and in contractile myoid cells, respectively. Finally, both dot blot and Elisa revealed the presence of Kiss1 in the epididymal fluid collected from epididymis cauda and caput, indicating that rat epididymis and spermatozoa possess a complete kisspeptin system. In conclusion, we reported for the first time in rodents Kiss1R trafficking in spermatozoa during the epididymis transit and Kiss1 measure in the epididymal fluid, thus suggesting a possible role for the system in spermatozoa maturation and storage within the epididymis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4782883
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