Simple Summary Metabolic reprogramming is a common phenomenon occurring in several solid tumors, among which are head and neck cancers, which allows them to better survive and progress. The main scope of the present work is to integrate the biological mechanisms underlying metabolic reprogramming, which often occurs in cancer cells, with the current therapeutic possibilities in the field of squamous neoplasms of the head and neck. The final goal is to provide a possible therapeutic approach that employs different combinations of chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy on the basis of the biology of the tumor. Counteracting metabolic reprogramming could be an interesting strategy in the near future. Carcinogenesis is a multistep process that consists of the transformation of healthy cells into cancer cells. Such an alteration goes through various stages and is closely linked to random mutations of genes that have a key role in the neoplastic phenotype. During carcinogenesis, cancer cells acquire and exhibit several characteristics including sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, activating invasion and metastasis, and expressing an immune phenotype, which allow them to evade recognition and destruction through cognate immune cells. In addition, cancer cells may acquire the ability to reprogram their metabolism in order to further promote growth, survival, and energy production. This phenomenon, termed metabolic reprogramming, is typical of all solid tumors, including squamous carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). In this review, we analyze the genetic and biological mechanisms underlying metabolic reprogramming of SCCHN, focusing on potential therapeutic strategies that are able to counteract it.

Cancer Cell Metabolism Reprogramming and Its Potential Implications on Therapy in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A Review

Sabbatino, Francesco;
2022

Abstract

Simple Summary Metabolic reprogramming is a common phenomenon occurring in several solid tumors, among which are head and neck cancers, which allows them to better survive and progress. The main scope of the present work is to integrate the biological mechanisms underlying metabolic reprogramming, which often occurs in cancer cells, with the current therapeutic possibilities in the field of squamous neoplasms of the head and neck. The final goal is to provide a possible therapeutic approach that employs different combinations of chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy on the basis of the biology of the tumor. Counteracting metabolic reprogramming could be an interesting strategy in the near future. Carcinogenesis is a multistep process that consists of the transformation of healthy cells into cancer cells. Such an alteration goes through various stages and is closely linked to random mutations of genes that have a key role in the neoplastic phenotype. During carcinogenesis, cancer cells acquire and exhibit several characteristics including sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, activating invasion and metastasis, and expressing an immune phenotype, which allow them to evade recognition and destruction through cognate immune cells. In addition, cancer cells may acquire the ability to reprogram their metabolism in order to further promote growth, survival, and energy production. This phenomenon, termed metabolic reprogramming, is typical of all solid tumors, including squamous carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). In this review, we analyze the genetic and biological mechanisms underlying metabolic reprogramming of SCCHN, focusing on potential therapeutic strategies that are able to counteract it.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4803672
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact