Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels with long-term outcome in patients with recent history of myocardial infarction (MI), and to investigate if diabetes may influence this association. Methods: Consecutive MI patients who underwent urgent/emergent coronary angiography from February 2013 to June 2019 were prospectively collected. The primary outcome was the composite of MI recurrence and all-cause death. The propensity score weighting technique was used to account for covariates potentially influencing the relationship between Lp(a) levels and the study outcomes. Results: The study population consisted of 1018 post-MI patients (median age 63 years). Diabetes was reported in 280 patients (27.5%), who showed lower Lp(a) levels than patients without diabetes (p = 0.026). At a median follow-up of 1121 days, the primary outcome was reported in 182 patients (17.9%). At univariable Cox regression analysis, Lp(a) was associated with the risk of the primary outcome in the overall population and in non-diabetic patients, but not in diabetics. The adjusted Cox regression analysis confirmed the independent association between Lp(a) values and the primary outcome in non-diabetic patients, but not in diabetics. Lp(a) levels > 70 mg/dL were independently associated with the risk of the primary outcome in non-diabetic patients (adjusted HR: 2.839; 95% CI, 1.382-5.832), but not in diabetics. Conclusions: In this real-world post-MI population, increasing Lp(a) levels were significantly associated with the risk of recurrent MI and all-cause death, and very high Lp(a) serum concentration independently predicted long-term outcome in non-diabetic patients, but not in diabetics.

Lipoprotein(a) levels and risk of adverse events after myocardial infarction in patients with and without diabetes

Silverio, Angelo
Methodology
;
Cancro, Francesco Paolo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Di Maio, Marco
Data Curation
;
Bellino, Michele
Conceptualization
;
Centore, Mario
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Carrizzo, Albino
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Di Pietro, Paola
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
De Luca, Giuseppe
Methodology
;
Vecchione, Carmine
Supervision
;
Galasso, Gennaro
Writing – Review & Editing
2022-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels with long-term outcome in patients with recent history of myocardial infarction (MI), and to investigate if diabetes may influence this association. Methods: Consecutive MI patients who underwent urgent/emergent coronary angiography from February 2013 to June 2019 were prospectively collected. The primary outcome was the composite of MI recurrence and all-cause death. The propensity score weighting technique was used to account for covariates potentially influencing the relationship between Lp(a) levels and the study outcomes. Results: The study population consisted of 1018 post-MI patients (median age 63 years). Diabetes was reported in 280 patients (27.5%), who showed lower Lp(a) levels than patients without diabetes (p = 0.026). At a median follow-up of 1121 days, the primary outcome was reported in 182 patients (17.9%). At univariable Cox regression analysis, Lp(a) was associated with the risk of the primary outcome in the overall population and in non-diabetic patients, but not in diabetics. The adjusted Cox regression analysis confirmed the independent association between Lp(a) values and the primary outcome in non-diabetic patients, but not in diabetics. Lp(a) levels > 70 mg/dL were independently associated with the risk of the primary outcome in non-diabetic patients (adjusted HR: 2.839; 95% CI, 1.382-5.832), but not in diabetics. Conclusions: In this real-world post-MI population, increasing Lp(a) levels were significantly associated with the risk of recurrent MI and all-cause death, and very high Lp(a) serum concentration independently predicted long-term outcome in non-diabetic patients, but not in diabetics.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4809894
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact