It is generally recognized that high-temperature treatments, namely annealing, influence the microstructure and the morphology, which, in turn, determine the mechanical properties of polymeric parts. Therefore, annealing can be adopted to control the mechanical performance of the molded parts. This work aims to assess the effect of annealing on the morphology developed in isotactic polypropylene (iPP) injection-molded parts. In particular, a two-step annealing is adopted: the polymer is injected in a mold at a high temperature (413 or 433 K), which is kept for 5 min (first annealing step); afterward, the mold temperature is cooled down at 403 K and held at that temperature for a time compatible with the crystallization half-time at that temperature (second annealing step). The characterization of morphology is carried out by optical and electronic scanning microscopy. The temperature of the first annealing step does not influence the thickness of the fibrillar skin layer; however, such a layer is thinner than that found in the molded parts obtained without any annealing steps. The second annealing step does not influence the thickness of the fibrillar skin layer. The dimension of spherulites found in the core is strongly influenced by both annealing steps: the spherulite dimensions enlarge by the effect of annealing steps. A model that considers spherulite and fibril evolutions is adopted to describe the effect of molding conditions on the final morphology distribution along the part thickness. The model, which adopts as input the thermo-mechanical histories calculated by commercial software for injection molding simulation, consistently predicts the main effects of the molding conditions on the morphology distributions.

Modeling and Analysis of Morphology of Injection Molding Polypropylene Parts Induced by In-Mold Annealing

Salomone R.;Speranza V.;Liparoti S.;Titomanlio G.;Pantani R.
2022-01-01

Abstract

It is generally recognized that high-temperature treatments, namely annealing, influence the microstructure and the morphology, which, in turn, determine the mechanical properties of polymeric parts. Therefore, annealing can be adopted to control the mechanical performance of the molded parts. This work aims to assess the effect of annealing on the morphology developed in isotactic polypropylene (iPP) injection-molded parts. In particular, a two-step annealing is adopted: the polymer is injected in a mold at a high temperature (413 or 433 K), which is kept for 5 min (first annealing step); afterward, the mold temperature is cooled down at 403 K and held at that temperature for a time compatible with the crystallization half-time at that temperature (second annealing step). The characterization of morphology is carried out by optical and electronic scanning microscopy. The temperature of the first annealing step does not influence the thickness of the fibrillar skin layer; however, such a layer is thinner than that found in the molded parts obtained without any annealing steps. The second annealing step does not influence the thickness of the fibrillar skin layer. The dimension of spherulites found in the core is strongly influenced by both annealing steps: the spherulite dimensions enlarge by the effect of annealing steps. A model that considers spherulite and fibril evolutions is adopted to describe the effect of molding conditions on the final morphology distribution along the part thickness. The model, which adopts as input the thermo-mechanical histories calculated by commercial software for injection molding simulation, consistently predicts the main effects of the molding conditions on the morphology distributions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4812957
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