BACKGROUND: Non-invasive ventilation may alter the morphology and histology of the upper airway mucosa. This study aimed to investigate the alterations of hypopharynx and oropharynx mucosa, identified during oro-tracheal intubation procedure via video-assisted laryngoscopy, in severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 related, treated by non-invasive ventilation via full-face mask or helmet.METHODS: Data of patients affected by Coronavirus 2 admitted to COVID Hospital of L'Aquila (Italy), presenting hypopharynx and oropharynx morphology alterations, requiring oro-tracheal intubation for invasive ventilation and initially treated with non-invasive ventilation were included in the study. The study aimed to investigate the upper airway mucosa alterations using oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal images and biopsies taken during video-assisted-laryngoscopy. Data from the hypopharynx and oropharynx morphology and histology alterations between non-invasive ventilation via a full-face mask or helmet used during hospitalization were compared.RESULTS: From 220 data recorded, 60 patients were included in the study and classified into non-invasive ventilation full-face mask group (30/60) and via helmet group. Comparing data between groups, significant differences were found with respect to hyperemia (77% vs. 20%), laryngeal bleeding ulcerations (87% vs. 13%), and vocal cord edema with >50% narrowing of the tracheal lumen (73% vs. 7%), respectively. The histology examination revealed fibrin-necrotic exudate with extensive necrotic degenerative changes in the sample tissue of the groups. There were not any differences in the duration time of non-invasive ventilation, time from hospitalization and the start of ventilation between groups.CONCLUSIONS: The data from this research suggested that there were differences in airway mucosa damages among patients treated with a full-face mask or helmet. Further studies should be planned to understand which non-invasive ventilation support may mitigate upper airway mucosa damages when oro-tracheal intubation is requested for invasive respiratory support.

Hypopharynx, oropharynx morphology and histology in severe Coronavirus 2 patients treated by noninvasive ventilation: comparison between full-face mask and helmet strategies

CASCELLA, Marco;
2022-01-01

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Non-invasive ventilation may alter the morphology and histology of the upper airway mucosa. This study aimed to investigate the alterations of hypopharynx and oropharynx mucosa, identified during oro-tracheal intubation procedure via video-assisted laryngoscopy, in severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 related, treated by non-invasive ventilation via full-face mask or helmet.METHODS: Data of patients affected by Coronavirus 2 admitted to COVID Hospital of L'Aquila (Italy), presenting hypopharynx and oropharynx morphology alterations, requiring oro-tracheal intubation for invasive ventilation and initially treated with non-invasive ventilation were included in the study. The study aimed to investigate the upper airway mucosa alterations using oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal images and biopsies taken during video-assisted-laryngoscopy. Data from the hypopharynx and oropharynx morphology and histology alterations between non-invasive ventilation via a full-face mask or helmet used during hospitalization were compared.RESULTS: From 220 data recorded, 60 patients were included in the study and classified into non-invasive ventilation full-face mask group (30/60) and via helmet group. Comparing data between groups, significant differences were found with respect to hyperemia (77% vs. 20%), laryngeal bleeding ulcerations (87% vs. 13%), and vocal cord edema with >50% narrowing of the tracheal lumen (73% vs. 7%), respectively. The histology examination revealed fibrin-necrotic exudate with extensive necrotic degenerative changes in the sample tissue of the groups. There were not any differences in the duration time of non-invasive ventilation, time from hospitalization and the start of ventilation between groups.CONCLUSIONS: The data from this research suggested that there were differences in airway mucosa damages among patients treated with a full-face mask or helmet. Further studies should be planned to understand which non-invasive ventilation support may mitigate upper airway mucosa damages when oro-tracheal intubation is requested for invasive respiratory support.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4856163
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