Introduction: Nowadays laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered as criterion standard for surgical treatment of acute calculous cholecystitis. During the last few years, there has been growing interest about the robotic approach. Several authors have reported the superiority of robotic cholecystectomy, associated with a lower percentage of conversion especially in patients with intraoperative diagnosis of acute or gangrenous cholecystitis. We report 3 case reports of moderate acute cholecystitis successfully treated by robotic cholecystectomy.Patient Concerns: Three patients presented moderate acute calculous cholecystitis with leukocytosis, fever, nausea, vomiting, and pain.Diagnosis: Three patients of our study population had clinical and laboratory suspicion of moderate acute calculous cholecystitis verified by abdominal ultrasound examination, which found out cholelitiasis in all 3 cases. Final diagnosis was confirmed by intraoperative findings and histopathological examination, with two empyematous cholecystitis and one perforated cholecystitis.Interventions: All patients underwent robotic cholecystectomy with the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. The entire procedure required a mean operation time of 128minutes and the average blood loss was 60 mL, without any intraoperative complications.Outcomes: In all 3 cases postoperative period was uneventfull. All the patients were discharged within 24hours and no readmissions were reported during a 30 days' follow-up.Conclusions: Robotic cholecystectomy for ACC is feasible and safe. Several studies have demonstrated that robotic approach reduces the risk of conversion to open surgery in case of acute or gangrenous cholecystitis. Our results are in line with current literature. In fact, we have successfully treated 2 patients with empyematous acute cholecystitis and 1 with gangrenous cholecystitis with a totally robotic approach, without any complications or need of conversion to open surgery. In conclusion, our results confirm that it is the time to include robotic surgery in the emergency setting.

Robotic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis: Three case reports

Bracale, U
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: Nowadays laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered as criterion standard for surgical treatment of acute calculous cholecystitis. During the last few years, there has been growing interest about the robotic approach. Several authors have reported the superiority of robotic cholecystectomy, associated with a lower percentage of conversion especially in patients with intraoperative diagnosis of acute or gangrenous cholecystitis. We report 3 case reports of moderate acute cholecystitis successfully treated by robotic cholecystectomy.Patient Concerns: Three patients presented moderate acute calculous cholecystitis with leukocytosis, fever, nausea, vomiting, and pain.Diagnosis: Three patients of our study population had clinical and laboratory suspicion of moderate acute calculous cholecystitis verified by abdominal ultrasound examination, which found out cholelitiasis in all 3 cases. Final diagnosis was confirmed by intraoperative findings and histopathological examination, with two empyematous cholecystitis and one perforated cholecystitis.Interventions: All patients underwent robotic cholecystectomy with the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. The entire procedure required a mean operation time of 128minutes and the average blood loss was 60 mL, without any intraoperative complications.Outcomes: In all 3 cases postoperative period was uneventfull. All the patients were discharged within 24hours and no readmissions were reported during a 30 days' follow-up.Conclusions: Robotic cholecystectomy for ACC is feasible and safe. Several studies have demonstrated that robotic approach reduces the risk of conversion to open surgery in case of acute or gangrenous cholecystitis. Our results are in line with current literature. In fact, we have successfully treated 2 patients with empyematous acute cholecystitis and 1 with gangrenous cholecystitis with a totally robotic approach, without any complications or need of conversion to open surgery. In conclusion, our results confirm that it is the time to include robotic surgery in the emergency setting.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4858637
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