Background: The human being is defined as a 'superorganism' since it is made up of its own cells and microorganisms that reside inside and outside the human body. Commensal microorganisms, which are even ten times more numerous than the cells present in the body, perform very important functions for the host, as they contribute to the health of the host, resist pathogens, maintain homeostasis, and modulate the immune system. In the mouth, there are different types of microorganisms, such as viruses, mycoplasmas, bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protozoa, often organized in communities. The aim of this umbrella review is to evaluate if there is a connection between the oral microbiome and systematic diseases. Methodology: A literature search was conducted through PubMed/MEDLINE, the COCHRANE library, Scopus, and Web of Science databases without any restrictions. Because of the large number of articles included and the wide range of methods and results among the studies found, it was not possible to report the results in the form of a systematic review or meta-analysis. Therefore, a narrative review was conducted. We obtained 73.931 results, of which 3593 passed the English language filter. After the screening of the titles and abstracts, non-topic entries were excluded, but most articles obtained concerned interactions between the oral microbiome and systemic diseases. Discussion: A description of the normal microbial flora was present in the oral cavity both in physiological conditions and in local pathological conditions and in the most widespread systemic pathologies. Furthermore, the therapeutic precautions that the clinician can follow in order to intervene on the change in the microbiome have been described. Conclusions: This review highlights what are the intercorrelations of the oral microbiota in healthy subjects and in subjects in pathological conditions. According to several recent studies, there is a clear correlation between dysbiosis of the oral microbiota and diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases.

The Interaction between the Oral Microbiome and Systemic Diseases: A Narrative Review

Pisano, Massimo;Giordano, Francesco;Sangiovanni, Giuseppe;Capuano, Nicoletta;Acerra, Alfonso;D'Ambrosio, Francesco
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: The human being is defined as a 'superorganism' since it is made up of its own cells and microorganisms that reside inside and outside the human body. Commensal microorganisms, which are even ten times more numerous than the cells present in the body, perform very important functions for the host, as they contribute to the health of the host, resist pathogens, maintain homeostasis, and modulate the immune system. In the mouth, there are different types of microorganisms, such as viruses, mycoplasmas, bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protozoa, often organized in communities. The aim of this umbrella review is to evaluate if there is a connection between the oral microbiome and systematic diseases. Methodology: A literature search was conducted through PubMed/MEDLINE, the COCHRANE library, Scopus, and Web of Science databases without any restrictions. Because of the large number of articles included and the wide range of methods and results among the studies found, it was not possible to report the results in the form of a systematic review or meta-analysis. Therefore, a narrative review was conducted. We obtained 73.931 results, of which 3593 passed the English language filter. After the screening of the titles and abstracts, non-topic entries were excluded, but most articles obtained concerned interactions between the oral microbiome and systemic diseases. Discussion: A description of the normal microbial flora was present in the oral cavity both in physiological conditions and in local pathological conditions and in the most widespread systemic pathologies. Furthermore, the therapeutic precautions that the clinician can follow in order to intervene on the change in the microbiome have been described. Conclusions: This review highlights what are the intercorrelations of the oral microbiota in healthy subjects and in subjects in pathological conditions. According to several recent studies, there is a clear correlation between dysbiosis of the oral microbiota and diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4865880
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