In this work, the susceptibility to pulsed light (PL) treatments of both a Gram-positive (L. innocua 11288) and a Gram-negative (E. coli DH5-α) bacteria inoculated in apple (pH=3.49, absorption coefficient 13.9 cm−1) and orange juices (pH=3.78, absorption coefficient 52.4 cm−1) was investigated in a range of energy dosages from 1.8 to 5.5 J/cm2. A laboratory scale continuous flow PL system was set up for the experiments, using a xenon flash-lamp emitting high intensity light in the range of 100–1100 nm. The flashes lasted 360 μs at a constant frequency of 3 Hz. The results highlighted how the lethal effect of pulsed light depended on the energy dose supplied, the absorption properties of liquid food as well as the bacterial strain examined. The higher the quantity of the energy delivered to the juice stream, the greater the inactivation level. However, the absorbance of the inoculated juice strongly influenced the dose deliver and, therefore, the efficiency of the PL treatment. Among the bacteria tested, E. coli cells showed a greater susceptibility to the PL treatment than L. innocua cells in both apple and orange juices. Following treatment at 4 J/cm2, microbial reductions in apple and orange juices were, respectively, 4.00 and 2.90 Log-cycles for E. coli and 2.98 and 0.93 Log-cycles for L. innocua. Sublethally injured cells were also detected for both bacterial strains, thus confirming that membrane damage is an important event in bacterial inactivation by PL.

Bacterial inactivation in fruit juices using a continuous flow Pulsed Light (PL) system

PATARO, GIANPIERO;FERRARI, Giovanna;
2011-01-01

Abstract

In this work, the susceptibility to pulsed light (PL) treatments of both a Gram-positive (L. innocua 11288) and a Gram-negative (E. coli DH5-α) bacteria inoculated in apple (pH=3.49, absorption coefficient 13.9 cm−1) and orange juices (pH=3.78, absorption coefficient 52.4 cm−1) was investigated in a range of energy dosages from 1.8 to 5.5 J/cm2. A laboratory scale continuous flow PL system was set up for the experiments, using a xenon flash-lamp emitting high intensity light in the range of 100–1100 nm. The flashes lasted 360 μs at a constant frequency of 3 Hz. The results highlighted how the lethal effect of pulsed light depended on the energy dose supplied, the absorption properties of liquid food as well as the bacterial strain examined. The higher the quantity of the energy delivered to the juice stream, the greater the inactivation level. However, the absorbance of the inoculated juice strongly influenced the dose deliver and, therefore, the efficiency of the PL treatment. Among the bacteria tested, E. coli cells showed a greater susceptibility to the PL treatment than L. innocua cells in both apple and orange juices. Following treatment at 4 J/cm2, microbial reductions in apple and orange juices were, respectively, 4.00 and 2.90 Log-cycles for E. coli and 2.98 and 0.93 Log-cycles for L. innocua. Sublethally injured cells were also detected for both bacterial strains, thus confirming that membrane damage is an important event in bacterial inactivation by PL.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/3023600
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