OBJECTIVES: The use of stem cell therapy for the repair of cartilage defects has shown promising results in in vitro and animal studies. However, only a small number of studies have been performed to evaluate the benefits in human subjects. The aim of this study is to systematically review studies that focus on the clinical application of stem cell therapy to treat cartilage defects in human subjects. DESIGN: A literature search was performed, adhering to the PRISMA guidelines, to review any studies using such techniques in humans. Our initial search retrieved 105 articles listed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, CINHal and SPortDiscus. From these studies, 11 studies meeting the eligibility criteria were selected and formed the basis of our systematic review. RESULTS: There is limited evidence showing the benefit in humans. The study designs, follow-up methods and criteria reporting and evaluation vary greatly between the studies and are outlined in our systematic review. CONCLUSION: With an increasing body of evidence in non-human and in vitro studies, more human trials are required. More high level studies with extensive and robust validated reporting methods should be conducted to evaluate the true effect of such techniques in human cartilage defect repairs.

Stem cell therapy for human cartilage defects: a systematic review.

MAFFULLI, Nicola;
2013

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The use of stem cell therapy for the repair of cartilage defects has shown promising results in in vitro and animal studies. However, only a small number of studies have been performed to evaluate the benefits in human subjects. The aim of this study is to systematically review studies that focus on the clinical application of stem cell therapy to treat cartilage defects in human subjects. DESIGN: A literature search was performed, adhering to the PRISMA guidelines, to review any studies using such techniques in humans. Our initial search retrieved 105 articles listed on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, CINHal and SPortDiscus. From these studies, 11 studies meeting the eligibility criteria were selected and formed the basis of our systematic review. RESULTS: There is limited evidence showing the benefit in humans. The study designs, follow-up methods and criteria reporting and evaluation vary greatly between the studies and are outlined in our systematic review. CONCLUSION: With an increasing body of evidence in non-human and in vitro studies, more human trials are required. More high level studies with extensive and robust validated reporting methods should be conducted to evaluate the true effect of such techniques in human cartilage defect repairs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4103854
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