BACKGROUND: Lateral ankle sprains account for 85% of ankle lesions. HYPOTHESIS: Combined open and arthroscopic procedures could improve the diagnosis and management of intra-articular lesions and allow surgeons to perform minimally invasive anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ligament complex. STUDY DESIGN: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. METHODS: Forty consecutive patients underwent ankle arthroscopy for recurrent (2 or more episodes) lateral ankle instability unresponsive to nonoperative measures. The clinical diagnosis of mechanical instability was confirmed at imaging (plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and arthroscopic assessment. All patients underwent arthroscopic Broström-Gould repair for management of lateral ankle instability; secondary lesions were also managed. Postoperatively, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was administered to assess the functional status; clinical examination and conventional radiographs were performed in all patients. RESULTS: Thirty-eight patients were reviewed at an average postoperative follow-up of 9.8 years. The mean AOFAS score was 90 (range, 44-100) at the last follow-up. No significantly different outcomes were found in patients who had undergone microfractures for management of grade III to IV cartilage lesions compared with patients with no cartilage lesions. Postoperative AOFAS scores were graded as excellent and good in almost all patients (94.7%). Concerning failure rate, 2 patients (5.3%) reported a low AOFAS score: one patient underwent soft tissue removal for anterior impingement, and one received simultaneous medial ankle instability repair. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic Broström-Gould-assisted technique could be a viable alternative to the gold-standard Broström-Gould procedure for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. Prospective randomized controlled trials are needed.

Arthroscopic-assisted Broström-Gould for chronic ankle instability: a long-term follow-up.

MAFFULLI, Nicola
2011

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lateral ankle sprains account for 85% of ankle lesions. HYPOTHESIS: Combined open and arthroscopic procedures could improve the diagnosis and management of intra-articular lesions and allow surgeons to perform minimally invasive anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ligament complex. STUDY DESIGN: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. METHODS: Forty consecutive patients underwent ankle arthroscopy for recurrent (2 or more episodes) lateral ankle instability unresponsive to nonoperative measures. The clinical diagnosis of mechanical instability was confirmed at imaging (plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and arthroscopic assessment. All patients underwent arthroscopic Broström-Gould repair for management of lateral ankle instability; secondary lesions were also managed. Postoperatively, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was administered to assess the functional status; clinical examination and conventional radiographs were performed in all patients. RESULTS: Thirty-eight patients were reviewed at an average postoperative follow-up of 9.8 years. The mean AOFAS score was 90 (range, 44-100) at the last follow-up. No significantly different outcomes were found in patients who had undergone microfractures for management of grade III to IV cartilage lesions compared with patients with no cartilage lesions. Postoperative AOFAS scores were graded as excellent and good in almost all patients (94.7%). Concerning failure rate, 2 patients (5.3%) reported a low AOFAS score: one patient underwent soft tissue removal for anterior impingement, and one received simultaneous medial ankle instability repair. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic Broström-Gould-assisted technique could be a viable alternative to the gold-standard Broström-Gould procedure for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. Prospective randomized controlled trials are needed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4195933
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