AIM: Thymectomy is the main treatment for thymoma and patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). The traditional approach is through a median sternotomy, but, recently, thymectomy through minimally invasive approaches is increasingly performed. Our purpose is an analysis and discussion of the clinical presentation, the diagnostic procedures and the surgical technique. We also consider post-operative complications and results, over a period of 5 years (May 2011–June 2016), in thymic masses admitted in our Thoracic Surgery Unit. METHODS: We analyzed 8 patients who underwent surgical treatment for thymic masses over a period of 5 years. 6 patients (75%) had thymoma, 2 patients (25%) had thymic carcinomas. 2 patients with thymoma (33%) had myasthenia gravis. We performed a complete surgical resection with median sternotomy as standard approach. RESULTS: One patient (12%) died in the postoperative period. The histological study revealed 6 (75%) thymoma and 2 (25%) thymic carcinomas. Post-operative morbidity occurred in 2 patients (25%) and were: pneumonia in 1 case (12%), atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion in 2 patients (25%). One patient with thymoma type A recurred at skeletal muscle 2-years after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Thymic malignancies are rare tumors. Surgical resection is the main treatment, but a multimodal approach is useful for many patients. Radical thymectomy is completed removing all the soft tissue in the anterior mediastinum between the two phrenic nerves and this is the most important factor in controlling myasthenia and influencing survival in patients with thymoma. Open (median sternotomy) approach has been the standard approach for thymectomy for the better visualization of the anatomical structures. Actually, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)thymectomy and robotic video-assisted thoracoscopic (R-VATS) approach versus open surgery has an equal if not superior oncological efficacy, better perioperative complications and survival outcome

Surgical approach in thymectomy: Our experience and review of the literature

DI CRESCENZO, Vincenzo Giuseppe;ZEPPA, Pio;VATRELLA, Alessandro;
2017

Abstract

AIM: Thymectomy is the main treatment for thymoma and patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). The traditional approach is through a median sternotomy, but, recently, thymectomy through minimally invasive approaches is increasingly performed. Our purpose is an analysis and discussion of the clinical presentation, the diagnostic procedures and the surgical technique. We also consider post-operative complications and results, over a period of 5 years (May 2011–June 2016), in thymic masses admitted in our Thoracic Surgery Unit. METHODS: We analyzed 8 patients who underwent surgical treatment for thymic masses over a period of 5 years. 6 patients (75%) had thymoma, 2 patients (25%) had thymic carcinomas. 2 patients with thymoma (33%) had myasthenia gravis. We performed a complete surgical resection with median sternotomy as standard approach. RESULTS: One patient (12%) died in the postoperative period. The histological study revealed 6 (75%) thymoma and 2 (25%) thymic carcinomas. Post-operative morbidity occurred in 2 patients (25%) and were: pneumonia in 1 case (12%), atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion in 2 patients (25%). One patient with thymoma type A recurred at skeletal muscle 2-years after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Thymic malignancies are rare tumors. Surgical resection is the main treatment, but a multimodal approach is useful for many patients. Radical thymectomy is completed removing all the soft tissue in the anterior mediastinum between the two phrenic nerves and this is the most important factor in controlling myasthenia and influencing survival in patients with thymoma. Open (median sternotomy) approach has been the standard approach for thymectomy for the better visualization of the anatomical structures. Actually, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)thymectomy and robotic video-assisted thoracoscopic (R-VATS) approach versus open surgery has an equal if not superior oncological efficacy, better perioperative complications and survival outcome
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4689855
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