Metallothionein is well known for its detoxificant and anti-oxidant properties and has been shown to be effective to prevent hydroxyl radical-generated DNA degradation. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the combined effect of two factors promoting cellular oxidative-stress, that is, the administration of the pesticide dichloro–diphenyl–dichloroethylene (DDE) and a high fat diet, on metallothionein expression and synthesis in rat liver and kidney. DDE is the main metabolite of dichloro–diphenyl–trichloroethane (DDT), and is commonly found in the food chain and in all tissues of living organisms, carried by the fats. Male Wistar rats were fed with a standard (N) or a high fat (HF) diet and exposed to DDE (10 mg/kg body mass, N + DDE and HF + DDE groups) or vehicle (corn oil, N, and HF groups) via gavage every day for 28 days. Tissues histology was determined by light microscopy analysis; differences in metallothionein gene expression and synthesis by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. Finally, protein cellular localization was established by immunocytochemistry. The results showed a different involvement of metallothionein in defending tissues from HF- and DDE-induced oxidative stress, suggesting that hepatic and renal cells use different strategies against pro-oxidant species. In both cell types a marked increase in the metallothionein content was observed in the nucleus, with a concomitant drop of the cytoplasmatic protein, either under HF- and DDE-stress conditions; however, no synergistic or additive effects were observed between the action of fats and pesticide. These findings reinforce the role of metallothionein in protecting DNA from oxidative damage.

Combined effects of DDE and hyperlipidic diet on metallothionein expression and synthesis in rat tissues

MIGLIACCIO, Vincenzo;LIONETTI, Lilla';
2018

Abstract

Metallothionein is well known for its detoxificant and anti-oxidant properties and has been shown to be effective to prevent hydroxyl radical-generated DNA degradation. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the combined effect of two factors promoting cellular oxidative-stress, that is, the administration of the pesticide dichloro–diphenyl–dichloroethylene (DDE) and a high fat diet, on metallothionein expression and synthesis in rat liver and kidney. DDE is the main metabolite of dichloro–diphenyl–trichloroethane (DDT), and is commonly found in the food chain and in all tissues of living organisms, carried by the fats. Male Wistar rats were fed with a standard (N) or a high fat (HF) diet and exposed to DDE (10 mg/kg body mass, N + DDE and HF + DDE groups) or vehicle (corn oil, N, and HF groups) via gavage every day for 28 days. Tissues histology was determined by light microscopy analysis; differences in metallothionein gene expression and synthesis by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. Finally, protein cellular localization was established by immunocytochemistry. The results showed a different involvement of metallothionein in defending tissues from HF- and DDE-induced oxidative stress, suggesting that hepatic and renal cells use different strategies against pro-oxidant species. In both cell types a marked increase in the metallothionein content was observed in the nucleus, with a concomitant drop of the cytoplasmatic protein, either under HF- and DDE-stress conditions; however, no synergistic or additive effects were observed between the action of fats and pesticide. These findings reinforce the role of metallothionein in protecting DNA from oxidative damage.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4720728
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