Breast cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by different biopathological features, differential response to therapy and substantial variability in long-term-survival. BC heterogeneity recapitulates genetic and epigenetic alterations affecting transformed cell behavior. The estrogen receptor alpha positive (ERα+) is the most common BC subtype, generally associated with a better prognosis and improved long-term survival, when compared to ERα-tumors. This is mainly due to the efficacy of endocrine therapy, that interfering with estrogen biosynthesis and actions blocks ER-mediated cell proliferation and tumor spread. Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy, however, represents a great challenge in the clinical management of ERα+ BC, causing tumor growth and recurrence irrespective of estrogen blockade. Improving overall survival in such cases requires new and effective anticancer drugs, allowing adjuvant treatments able to overcome resistance to first-line endocrine therapy. To date, several studies focus on the application of loss-of-function genome-wide screenings to identify key (hub) "fitness" genes essential for BC progression and representing candidate drug targets to overcome lack of response, or acquired resistance, to current therapies. Here, we review the biological significance of essential genes and relative functional pathways affected in ERα+ BC, most of which are strictly interconnected with each other and represent potential effective targets for novel molecular therapies.

Global View of Candidate Therapeutic Target Genes in Hormone-Responsive Breast Cancer

Salvati, Annamaria
Methodology
;
Nassa, Giovanni
Methodology
;
Cracas, Daniela Georgia Cristina
Methodology
;
Mastrocinque, Raffaella
Methodology
;
Rizzo, Francesca
Methodology
;
Tarallo, Roberta
Methodology
;
Weisz, Alessandro
Supervision
;
Giurato, Giorgio
Project Administration
2020

Abstract

Breast cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by different biopathological features, differential response to therapy and substantial variability in long-term-survival. BC heterogeneity recapitulates genetic and epigenetic alterations affecting transformed cell behavior. The estrogen receptor alpha positive (ERα+) is the most common BC subtype, generally associated with a better prognosis and improved long-term survival, when compared to ERα-tumors. This is mainly due to the efficacy of endocrine therapy, that interfering with estrogen biosynthesis and actions blocks ER-mediated cell proliferation and tumor spread. Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy, however, represents a great challenge in the clinical management of ERα+ BC, causing tumor growth and recurrence irrespective of estrogen blockade. Improving overall survival in such cases requires new and effective anticancer drugs, allowing adjuvant treatments able to overcome resistance to first-line endocrine therapy. To date, several studies focus on the application of loss-of-function genome-wide screenings to identify key (hub) "fitness" genes essential for BC progression and representing candidate drug targets to overcome lack of response, or acquired resistance, to current therapies. Here, we review the biological significance of essential genes and relative functional pathways affected in ERα+ BC, most of which are strictly interconnected with each other and represent potential effective targets for novel molecular therapies.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4747472
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 8
  • Scopus 11
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 11
social impact