In continuity with research on learning through mirror neurons (Rizzolatti G., Sinigaglia C. 2005), with a constructivist conviction (Bellantonio, 2014) it is stated that sports practice, as an instrument that exposes the person to multiple and different motor stimuli and perceptive is an effective medium for psychomotor development. In addition to promoting physical growth and organic development, motor skills also promote the growth of learning. It is no coincidence that psychomotor activity educates and realizes the whole of the person and constitutes an important means of interacting with it through movement. (Lapierre, A., 2001) The research group from Salerno conducted a field research involving a sample of 281 children between 6 and 8 years old, who were given the APCM-2 protocol (Sabbadini, 2005) and who were divided into three categories thanks to a survey completed through questionnaires: children who practice motor activity, children who do not practice motor activity, children who have not returned the questionnaire (group that is supposed to be mixed). It has emerged that participation in a motor activity produces positive effects on the development of the motor pattern and therefore of the person as a whole, achieving homogeneously higher scores on average than the other groups. Therefore, motor activities in school age represent a facilitator in psychomotor development as the stimulation of fundamental motor skills helps children in recreational activities by allowing them to manipulate their environmental conditions and control their own bodies. (Goodway, 2003).

The effectiveness of motor activity on psychomotor development in school-aged children

Pallonetto, Lucia;Palumbo, Carmen
2020

Abstract

In continuity with research on learning through mirror neurons (Rizzolatti G., Sinigaglia C. 2005), with a constructivist conviction (Bellantonio, 2014) it is stated that sports practice, as an instrument that exposes the person to multiple and different motor stimuli and perceptive is an effective medium for psychomotor development. In addition to promoting physical growth and organic development, motor skills also promote the growth of learning. It is no coincidence that psychomotor activity educates and realizes the whole of the person and constitutes an important means of interacting with it through movement. (Lapierre, A., 2001) The research group from Salerno conducted a field research involving a sample of 281 children between 6 and 8 years old, who were given the APCM-2 protocol (Sabbadini, 2005) and who were divided into three categories thanks to a survey completed through questionnaires: children who practice motor activity, children who do not practice motor activity, children who have not returned the questionnaire (group that is supposed to be mixed). It has emerged that participation in a motor activity produces positive effects on the development of the motor pattern and therefore of the person as a whole, achieving homogeneously higher scores on average than the other groups. Therefore, motor activities in school age represent a facilitator in psychomotor development as the stimulation of fundamental motor skills helps children in recreational activities by allowing them to manipulate their environmental conditions and control their own bodies. (Goodway, 2003).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4747663
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