Italy is a particularly interesting context in which to study the phenomenon of bullying given the steadily increasing number of immigrant students attending Italian primary schools. We examined the psychometric properties of a short self-report measure of bullying and victimization across groups of students with various migration backgrounds. We then estimated, by latent mean comparisons, the rates of prevalence of bullying and victimization among different generations of immigrants and native students. Results concerning the factor structure of the measure were consistent with studies in other cultural contexts and complete scalar measurement invariance was found across immigrant backgrounds. The analyses showed that both first- and second-generation immigrant pupils reported being victimized more frequently than their native peers. However, the incidence of victimization for second generations was lower than that for first generations. Finally, no differences across different generations of immigrants and native students were found in reported bullying behaviors.

Measuring Bullying and Victimization Among Immigrant and Native Primary School Students: Evidence From Italy

Cavicchiolo E.;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Italy is a particularly interesting context in which to study the phenomenon of bullying given the steadily increasing number of immigrant students attending Italian primary schools. We examined the psychometric properties of a short self-report measure of bullying and victimization across groups of students with various migration backgrounds. We then estimated, by latent mean comparisons, the rates of prevalence of bullying and victimization among different generations of immigrants and native students. Results concerning the factor structure of the measure were consistent with studies in other cultural contexts and complete scalar measurement invariance was found across immigrant backgrounds. The analyses showed that both first- and second-generation immigrant pupils reported being victimized more frequently than their native peers. However, the incidence of victimization for second generations was lower than that for first generations. Finally, no differences across different generations of immigrants and native students were found in reported bullying behaviors.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4751645
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