Objectives: Childhood maltreatment has been associated to an increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (BD). A role of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in mediating trauma-related risk for adult psychopathology has been suggested but scarcely investigated in BD. Therefore, we explored the impact of childhood maltreatment on clinical features of BD and on the activity of the HPA axis. Methods: One hundred and six patients participated in the study. On the basis of their history of childhood trauma, as assessed by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), they were divided into a group with a history of childhood maltreatment (CM+) and a group without (CM−). Twenty-nine participants (16 with a history of childhood trauma and 13 without) underwent the cortisol awakening response (CAR) test. Results: Sixty-two patients had a history of childhood maltreatment and 44 had not. Maltreatment was significantly more frequent in females than males. CM+ patients showed a significant higher body mass index, a significant higher number of suicide attempts, and more severe mania symptoms than CM− ones. Logistic regression indicated a significant association between lifetime suicide attempts and any type of childhood maltreatment and between emotional abuse and the presence of psychotic symptoms or mixed mood episodes. CM+ individuals with BD exhibited a significantly reduced CAR with respect to CM− ones. Discussion: Our results add to literature findings showing a worse clinical course in BD patients with a history of childhood maltreatments and show for the first time that childhood trauma exposure is associated to an impaired CAR in adults with BD.

Clinical and neuroendocrine correlates of childhood maltreatment history in adults with bipolar disorder

Cascino G.;Marciello F.;Monteleone P.;
2020

Abstract

Objectives: Childhood maltreatment has been associated to an increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (BD). A role of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in mediating trauma-related risk for adult psychopathology has been suggested but scarcely investigated in BD. Therefore, we explored the impact of childhood maltreatment on clinical features of BD and on the activity of the HPA axis. Methods: One hundred and six patients participated in the study. On the basis of their history of childhood trauma, as assessed by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), they were divided into a group with a history of childhood maltreatment (CM+) and a group without (CM−). Twenty-nine participants (16 with a history of childhood trauma and 13 without) underwent the cortisol awakening response (CAR) test. Results: Sixty-two patients had a history of childhood maltreatment and 44 had not. Maltreatment was significantly more frequent in females than males. CM+ patients showed a significant higher body mass index, a significant higher number of suicide attempts, and more severe mania symptoms than CM− ones. Logistic regression indicated a significant association between lifetime suicide attempts and any type of childhood maltreatment and between emotional abuse and the presence of psychotic symptoms or mixed mood episodes. CM+ individuals with BD exhibited a significantly reduced CAR with respect to CM− ones. Discussion: Our results add to literature findings showing a worse clinical course in BD patients with a history of childhood maltreatments and show for the first time that childhood trauma exposure is associated to an impaired CAR in adults with BD.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4754347
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