: Maternal gestational obesity is a risk factor for offspring's neurodevelopment and later neuro-cognitive disorders. Altered gut microbiota composition has been found in patients with neurocognitive disorders, and in relation to maternal metabolic health. We explored the associations between gut microbiota and cognitive development during infancy, and their link with maternal obesity. In groups of children from the Pisa birth Cohort (PISAC), we analysed faecal microbiota composition by 16S rRNA marker gene sequencing of first-pass meconium samples and of faecal samples collected at age 3, 6, 12, 24, 36 months, and its relationship with maternal gestational obesity or diabetes, and with cognitive development, as measured from 6 to 60 months of age by the Griffith's Mental Development Scales. Gut microbiota composition in the first phases of life is dominated by Bifidobacteria (Actinobacteria phylum), with contribution of Escherichia/Shigella and Klebsiella genera (Proteobacteria phylum), whereas Firmicutes become more dominant at 36 months of age. Maternal overweight leads to lower abundance of Bifidobacterium, Blautia and Ruminococcus, and lower practical reasoning scores in the offspring at the age of 36 months. In the whole population, microbiota in the first-pass meconium samples shows much higher alpha diversity compared to later samples, and its composition, particularly Bifidobacterium and Veillonella abundances, correlates with practical reasoning scores at 60 months of age. Maternal overweight correlates with bacterial colonization and with the development of reasoning skills at pre-school age. Associations between neonatal gut colonization and later cognitive function provide new perspectives of primary (antenatal) prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and neonatal gut bacterial colonization are associated with cognitive development and gut microbiota composition in pre-school-age offspring

Rizzo, Francesca
Investigation
;
Weisz, Alessandro
Investigation
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

: Maternal gestational obesity is a risk factor for offspring's neurodevelopment and later neuro-cognitive disorders. Altered gut microbiota composition has been found in patients with neurocognitive disorders, and in relation to maternal metabolic health. We explored the associations between gut microbiota and cognitive development during infancy, and their link with maternal obesity. In groups of children from the Pisa birth Cohort (PISAC), we analysed faecal microbiota composition by 16S rRNA marker gene sequencing of first-pass meconium samples and of faecal samples collected at age 3, 6, 12, 24, 36 months, and its relationship with maternal gestational obesity or diabetes, and with cognitive development, as measured from 6 to 60 months of age by the Griffith's Mental Development Scales. Gut microbiota composition in the first phases of life is dominated by Bifidobacteria (Actinobacteria phylum), with contribution of Escherichia/Shigella and Klebsiella genera (Proteobacteria phylum), whereas Firmicutes become more dominant at 36 months of age. Maternal overweight leads to lower abundance of Bifidobacterium, Blautia and Ruminococcus, and lower practical reasoning scores in the offspring at the age of 36 months. In the whole population, microbiota in the first-pass meconium samples shows much higher alpha diversity compared to later samples, and its composition, particularly Bifidobacterium and Veillonella abundances, correlates with practical reasoning scores at 60 months of age. Maternal overweight correlates with bacterial colonization and with the development of reasoning skills at pre-school age. Associations between neonatal gut colonization and later cognitive function provide new perspectives of primary (antenatal) prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4774413
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