Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), the primary persistent metabolite of dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), has toxic effects on cells, but its dose-dependent impact on mitochondrial proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion and fission processes associated with cell viability impairment has not yet been analysed. Mitochondrial fusion and fission processes are critical to maintaining the mitochondrial network and allowing the cell to respond to external stressors such as environmental pol-lutants. Fusion processes are associated with optimizing mitochondrial function, whereas fission processes are associated with removing damaged mitochondria. We assessed the effects of different DDE doses, ranging between 0.5 and 100 µM, on cell viability and mitochondrial fusion/fission proteins in an in vitro hepatic cell model (human hepatocarcinomatous cells, HepG2); the DDE induced a decrease in cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was enhanced in conditions of coincubation with dietary fatty acids. Fusion protein markers exhibited an inverted U-shape dose-response curve, showing the highest content in the 2.5–25 µM DDE dose range. The fission protein marker was found to increase significantly, leading to an increased fission/fusion ratio with high DDE doses. The low DDE doses elicited cell adaption by stimulating mitochondrial dynamics machinery, whereas high DDE doses induced cell viability loss associated with mitochondrial dynamics to shift toward fission. Present results are helpful to clarify the mechanisms underlying the cell fate towards survival or death in response to increasing doses of environmental pollutants.

Dose-dependent response to the environmental pollutant dichlorodipheniletylhene (Dde) in hepg2 cells: Focus on cell viability and mitochondrial fusion/fission proteins

Migliaccio V.;Lepretti M.;Paolella G.;Di Gregorio I.;Penna S.;Lionetti L.
Project Administration
2021

Abstract

Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), the primary persistent metabolite of dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), has toxic effects on cells, but its dose-dependent impact on mitochondrial proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion and fission processes associated with cell viability impairment has not yet been analysed. Mitochondrial fusion and fission processes are critical to maintaining the mitochondrial network and allowing the cell to respond to external stressors such as environmental pol-lutants. Fusion processes are associated with optimizing mitochondrial function, whereas fission processes are associated with removing damaged mitochondria. We assessed the effects of different DDE doses, ranging between 0.5 and 100 µM, on cell viability and mitochondrial fusion/fission proteins in an in vitro hepatic cell model (human hepatocarcinomatous cells, HepG2); the DDE induced a decrease in cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was enhanced in conditions of coincubation with dietary fatty acids. Fusion protein markers exhibited an inverted U-shape dose-response curve, showing the highest content in the 2.5–25 µM DDE dose range. The fission protein marker was found to increase significantly, leading to an increased fission/fusion ratio with high DDE doses. The low DDE doses elicited cell adaption by stimulating mitochondrial dynamics machinery, whereas high DDE doses induced cell viability loss associated with mitochondrial dynamics to shift toward fission. Present results are helpful to clarify the mechanisms underlying the cell fate towards survival or death in response to increasing doses of environmental pollutants.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4775967
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