This study explores which patient characteristics could affect the likelihood of starting low back pain (LBP) treatment with opioid analgesics vs. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) in an Italian primary care setting. Through the computerized medical records of 65 General Practitioners, non-malignant LBP subjects who received the first pain intensity measurement and an NSAID or opioid prescription, during 2015–2016, were identified. Patients with an opioid prescription 1-year before the first pain intensity measurement were excluded. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine predictive factors of opioid prescribing. Results were reported as Odds Ratios (ORs) with a 95% confidence interval (CI), with p < 0.05 indicating statistical significance. A total of 505 individuals with LBP were included: of those, 72.7% received an NSAID prescription and 27.3% an opioid one (64% of subjects started with strong opioid). Compared to patients receiving an NSAID, those with opioid prescriptions were younger, reported the highest pain intensity (moderate pain OR = 2.42; 95% CI 1.48–3.96 and severe pain OR = 2.01; 95% CI 1.04–3.88) and were more likely to have asthma (OR 3.95; 95% CI 1.99–7.84). Despite clinical guidelines, a large proportion of LBP patients started with strong opioid therapy. Asthma, younger age and pain intensity were predictors of opioid prescribing when compared to NSAIDs for LBP treatment.

Predictors of opioid prescribing for non-malignant low back pain in an italian primary care setting

Conti V.
Validation
;
2021

Abstract

This study explores which patient characteristics could affect the likelihood of starting low back pain (LBP) treatment with opioid analgesics vs. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) in an Italian primary care setting. Through the computerized medical records of 65 General Practitioners, non-malignant LBP subjects who received the first pain intensity measurement and an NSAID or opioid prescription, during 2015–2016, were identified. Patients with an opioid prescription 1-year before the first pain intensity measurement were excluded. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine predictive factors of opioid prescribing. Results were reported as Odds Ratios (ORs) with a 95% confidence interval (CI), with p < 0.05 indicating statistical significance. A total of 505 individuals with LBP were included: of those, 72.7% received an NSAID prescription and 27.3% an opioid one (64% of subjects started with strong opioid). Compared to patients receiving an NSAID, those with opioid prescriptions were younger, reported the highest pain intensity (moderate pain OR = 2.42; 95% CI 1.48–3.96 and severe pain OR = 2.01; 95% CI 1.04–3.88) and were more likely to have asthma (OR 3.95; 95% CI 1.99–7.84). Despite clinical guidelines, a large proportion of LBP patients started with strong opioid therapy. Asthma, younger age and pain intensity were predictors of opioid prescribing when compared to NSAIDs for LBP treatment.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4779206
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