Background/purpose: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a potentially life-threatening condition occurring 2–6 weeks after Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in previously healthy children and adolescents, characterized by clinical and laboratory evidence of multiorgan inflammation. We reported the case of a 6-year-old child presented with acute abdomen and then diagnosed with MIS-C. In addition, to better portray this new entity, we performed a systematic review of MIS-C gastrointestinal features and particularly on those mimicking surgical emergencies. Methods: We described the clinical presentation, the diagnostic approach and the therapeutic outcomes of our MIS-C patient. Parallel to this, we conducted a systematic literature search using Google Scholar, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, focusing on gastrointestinal MIS-C. Results: Our patient was initially assessed by the surgical team due to his query acute abdomen. Following the diagnosis of MIS-C with myocarditis, intravenous methylprednisolone (2 mg/Kg/day) and intravenous immunoglobulins (2 gr/Kg single infusion) were promptly started, leading to clinical improvement. According to our literature search, patients with MIS-C have a high rate of severe abdominal symptoms resembling surgical emergencies (appendicitis, obstruction, etc.) and a not negligible number of those patients have been surgically explored with variable findings. Conclusions: We encourage pediatric surgeons in the upcoming months of COVID-19 pandemic to evaluate myocardial function prior to surgical abdominal exploration. In children with query acute abdomen, MIS-C should be promptly ruled out in order to avoid unnecessary surgeries that could worsen the already frail outcome of this new syndrome. Nevertheless, it should be considered that MIS-C might well encompass complications (e.g. appendicitis, segmental intestinal ischemia) which need swift surgical treatment.

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. An emerging clinical challenge for pediatric surgeons in the COVID 19 era

Verde A.;Veneruso D.;Orlando F.;Mandato C.
2021

Abstract

Background/purpose: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a potentially life-threatening condition occurring 2–6 weeks after Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in previously healthy children and adolescents, characterized by clinical and laboratory evidence of multiorgan inflammation. We reported the case of a 6-year-old child presented with acute abdomen and then diagnosed with MIS-C. In addition, to better portray this new entity, we performed a systematic review of MIS-C gastrointestinal features and particularly on those mimicking surgical emergencies. Methods: We described the clinical presentation, the diagnostic approach and the therapeutic outcomes of our MIS-C patient. Parallel to this, we conducted a systematic literature search using Google Scholar, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, focusing on gastrointestinal MIS-C. Results: Our patient was initially assessed by the surgical team due to his query acute abdomen. Following the diagnosis of MIS-C with myocarditis, intravenous methylprednisolone (2 mg/Kg/day) and intravenous immunoglobulins (2 gr/Kg single infusion) were promptly started, leading to clinical improvement. According to our literature search, patients with MIS-C have a high rate of severe abdominal symptoms resembling surgical emergencies (appendicitis, obstruction, etc.) and a not negligible number of those patients have been surgically explored with variable findings. Conclusions: We encourage pediatric surgeons in the upcoming months of COVID-19 pandemic to evaluate myocardial function prior to surgical abdominal exploration. In children with query acute abdomen, MIS-C should be promptly ruled out in order to avoid unnecessary surgeries that could worsen the already frail outcome of this new syndrome. Nevertheless, it should be considered that MIS-C might well encompass complications (e.g. appendicitis, segmental intestinal ischemia) which need swift surgical treatment.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11386/4780801
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