Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and behavioral variant of Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD) are characterized respectively by atrophy in the medial temporal lobe with memory loss and prefrontal and anterior temporal degeneration with dysexecutive syndrome. In this study, we hypothesized that specific gait patterns are induced by either frontal or temporal degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we studied the gait pattern in bvFTD (23) and AD (22) patients in single and dual task (“motor” and “cognitive”) conditions. To detect subtle alterations, we performed motion analysis estimating both spatio-temporal parameters and joint excursions. In the single task condition, the bvFTD group was more unstable and slower compared to healthy subjects, while only two stability parameters were compromised in the AD group. During the motor dual task, both velocity and stability parameters worsened further in the bvFTD group. In the same experimental conditions, AD patients showed a significantly lower speed and stride length than healthy subjects. During the cognitive dual task, a further impairment of velocity and stability parameters was observed in the bvFTD group. Interestingly, during the cognitive dual task, the gait performance of the AD group markedly deteriorated, as documented by the impairment of more indices of velocity and stability. Finally, the kinematic data of thigh, knee, and ankle were more helpful in revealing gait impairment than the spatio-temporal parameters alone. In conclusion, our data showed that the dysexecutive syndrome induces specific gait alterations. Furthermore, our results suggest that the gait worsens in the AD patients when the cognitive resources are stressed.

Spatio-temporal and kinematic gait analysis in patients with Frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease through 3D motion capture

Agosti, Valeria;
2017-01-01

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and behavioral variant of Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD) are characterized respectively by atrophy in the medial temporal lobe with memory loss and prefrontal and anterior temporal degeneration with dysexecutive syndrome. In this study, we hypothesized that specific gait patterns are induced by either frontal or temporal degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we studied the gait pattern in bvFTD (23) and AD (22) patients in single and dual task (“motor” and “cognitive”) conditions. To detect subtle alterations, we performed motion analysis estimating both spatio-temporal parameters and joint excursions. In the single task condition, the bvFTD group was more unstable and slower compared to healthy subjects, while only two stability parameters were compromised in the AD group. During the motor dual task, both velocity and stability parameters worsened further in the bvFTD group. In the same experimental conditions, AD patients showed a significantly lower speed and stride length than healthy subjects. During the cognitive dual task, a further impairment of velocity and stability parameters was observed in the bvFTD group. Interestingly, during the cognitive dual task, the gait performance of the AD group markedly deteriorated, as documented by the impairment of more indices of velocity and stability. Finally, the kinematic data of thigh, knee, and ankle were more helpful in revealing gait impairment than the spatio-temporal parameters alone. In conclusion, our data showed that the dysexecutive syndrome induces specific gait alterations. Furthermore, our results suggest that the gait worsens in the AD patients when the cognitive resources are stressed.
2017
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4844937
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