This manuscript delves into the pivotal role of sustainable agriculture in addressing environmental challenges and meeting the nutritional demands of a burgeoning global population. The primary objective is to assess the impact of a recently developed eco-friendly fertilizer, denoted as SBO, which arises from the blend of organic and mineral components derived from agricultural waste, sulfur, and residual orange materials. These elements are bound together with bentonite. This study compares SBO with distinct fertilizer treatments, including horse manure (HM) and nitrogen–phosphorous–potassium (NPK), on two diverse tomato-growing soils, each characterized by unique chemical and biological properties. Furthermore, the research extends to evaluate the environmental implications of these fertilizers, with a specific focus on their carbon and water footprints. Soils have been chemically and biochemically analyzed, and carbon and water footprints (CF and WF, respectively) have been assessed. The results reveal substantial enhancements in soil quality with the application of SBO fertilizer. Both soils undergo a transition towards near-neutral pH levels, an increase in organic matter content, and heightened microbial biomass. SBO-treated soils exhibit notably superior enzyme activities. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) results affirm the sustainability of the SBO-based system, boasting the lowest CF, while NPK demonstrates the highest environmental impact. Consistently, the WF analysis aligns with these findings, indicating that SBO necessitates the least water for tomato production. In summary, this study underscores the critical importance of adopting sustainable fertilization practices for enhancing soil quality and reducing environmental footprints in agriculture. The promising results offer potential benefits for both food production and environmental conservation.

Comparative Study of Fertilizers in Tomato-Grown Soils: Soil Quality, Sustainability, and Carbon/Water Footprints

G. Celano
Methodology
;
2023-01-01

Abstract

This manuscript delves into the pivotal role of sustainable agriculture in addressing environmental challenges and meeting the nutritional demands of a burgeoning global population. The primary objective is to assess the impact of a recently developed eco-friendly fertilizer, denoted as SBO, which arises from the blend of organic and mineral components derived from agricultural waste, sulfur, and residual orange materials. These elements are bound together with bentonite. This study compares SBO with distinct fertilizer treatments, including horse manure (HM) and nitrogen–phosphorous–potassium (NPK), on two diverse tomato-growing soils, each characterized by unique chemical and biological properties. Furthermore, the research extends to evaluate the environmental implications of these fertilizers, with a specific focus on their carbon and water footprints. Soils have been chemically and biochemically analyzed, and carbon and water footprints (CF and WF, respectively) have been assessed. The results reveal substantial enhancements in soil quality with the application of SBO fertilizer. Both soils undergo a transition towards near-neutral pH levels, an increase in organic matter content, and heightened microbial biomass. SBO-treated soils exhibit notably superior enzyme activities. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) results affirm the sustainability of the SBO-based system, boasting the lowest CF, while NPK demonstrates the highest environmental impact. Consistently, the WF analysis aligns with these findings, indicating that SBO necessitates the least water for tomato production. In summary, this study underscores the critical importance of adopting sustainable fertilization practices for enhancing soil quality and reducing environmental footprints in agriculture. The promising results offer potential benefits for both food production and environmental conservation.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4853016
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