Corylus avellana L. is a species highly susceptible to water stresses caused by vapor pressure deficit and high temperature. Under such conditions, transpiration is strongly constrained even with good soil water availability. This is due to ineffective drought resistance mechanisms and indicates the need to identify early indicators of plant stress that are easy to measure, effective and efficient. This research explored the possibility of using stomatal conductance and leaf water potentials as early indicators of stress. For this purpose, an experiment was set up in a commercial 5-year-old Corylus avellana L. var. 'McDonald' orchard located in Willamette valley. The experimental designed featured irrigated and rainfed trees, and potential stress indicators were monitored at different times of the day in canopy sections aligned to cardinal directions. Results show that hazelnut trees rapidly reduced leaf stomatal conductance when the vapor pressure deficit increased to 2 and 2.5 kPa during the diurnal cycle in both irrigated and rainfed trees, even with good water availability. This suggests leaf stomatal conductance can be an efficient and effective early indicator of stress. In addition, results suggest that stomatal conductance should be measured on leaves on the west and north aspects of the canopy, where they showed lowest and highest values respectively. Leaf and stem water potential values increased during the measurement period and show a strong correlation, but their mean values do not show statistically significant differences between treatments. In Willamette valley conditions, stomatal conductance provided earlier indication of stress than water potential. The results obtained are of methodological importance for the future design of experimental plans.

Assessment of leaf water potential and stomatal conductance as early signs of stress in young hazelnut tree in Willamette valley

Gessica Altieri
Conceptualization
;
Francesca Santoro
Formal Analysis
;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Corylus avellana L. is a species highly susceptible to water stresses caused by vapor pressure deficit and high temperature. Under such conditions, transpiration is strongly constrained even with good soil water availability. This is due to ineffective drought resistance mechanisms and indicates the need to identify early indicators of plant stress that are easy to measure, effective and efficient. This research explored the possibility of using stomatal conductance and leaf water potentials as early indicators of stress. For this purpose, an experiment was set up in a commercial 5-year-old Corylus avellana L. var. 'McDonald' orchard located in Willamette valley. The experimental designed featured irrigated and rainfed trees, and potential stress indicators were monitored at different times of the day in canopy sections aligned to cardinal directions. Results show that hazelnut trees rapidly reduced leaf stomatal conductance when the vapor pressure deficit increased to 2 and 2.5 kPa during the diurnal cycle in both irrigated and rainfed trees, even with good water availability. This suggests leaf stomatal conductance can be an efficient and effective early indicator of stress. In addition, results suggest that stomatal conductance should be measured on leaves on the west and north aspects of the canopy, where they showed lowest and highest values respectively. Leaf and stem water potential values increased during the measurement period and show a strong correlation, but their mean values do not show statistically significant differences between treatments. In Willamette valley conditions, stomatal conductance provided earlier indication of stress than water potential. The results obtained are of methodological importance for the future design of experimental plans.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4853017
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