Purpose: Groin pain is a widely recognized medical issue among athletes. Groin pain can affect both player and team performance and sometimes can be a career-ending injury. The aim of this study was to assess seasonal groin pain prevalence and the average seasonal time loss from sport for each injury in different team sport athletes. The hip and groin functionality at the beginning of the following season was also investigated. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken on 600 team sport athletes (soccer, futsal, basketball, volleyball, and water polo players). The seasonal prevalence of groin pain, level of competition (professional and non-professional), time loss, and concomitant injuries in addition to groin pain were reported and analyzed. The Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS) was used to assess hip and groin pain and function related to sport and activity. Results: Among the 506 (84%) players included, 123 players (24.3%) reported groin pain. Overall, soccer players reported the highest groin pain prevalence (32.5%) followed by futsal (25.5%), basketball (25.2%), water polo (17.6%) and volleyball players (13.6%). Professional soccer, futsal and basketball athletes showed higher groin pain prevalence in comparison with non-professional athletes (p = 0.02, p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively). The mean time loss from sport due to groin pain was 60.3 ± 66 days in soccer, 41.1 ± 16.6 days in futsal, 31.5 ± 18 days in water polo, 37.2 ± 14.2 days in basketball and 50.8 ± 24.6 days in volleyball. Significantly lower HAGOS values were found in athletes with groin pain for all sports evaluated compared to athletes with no groin pain history (p = 0.0001). Longer time loss from sport was correlated with lower HAGOS values in soccer (p = 0.002) and futsal (p = 0.002) players with groin pain. Concomitant injuries were correlated with lower HAGOS values in water polo players (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Seasonal groin pain occurs in as many as one in four team sport athletes. Soccer players show the highest groin pain prevalence and the longest time loss from sport. Professional athletes report higher prevalence of groin pain in comparison with non-professional athletes. HAGOS appears to be a valid outcome instrument to measure groin pain, correlating with both time loss from sport and concomitant injuries in athletes. Level of evidence: Level IV.

Soccer players show the highest seasonal groin pain prevalence and the longest time loss from sport among 500 athletes from major team sports

Galasso O.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: Groin pain is a widely recognized medical issue among athletes. Groin pain can affect both player and team performance and sometimes can be a career-ending injury. The aim of this study was to assess seasonal groin pain prevalence and the average seasonal time loss from sport for each injury in different team sport athletes. The hip and groin functionality at the beginning of the following season was also investigated. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken on 600 team sport athletes (soccer, futsal, basketball, volleyball, and water polo players). The seasonal prevalence of groin pain, level of competition (professional and non-professional), time loss, and concomitant injuries in addition to groin pain were reported and analyzed. The Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS) was used to assess hip and groin pain and function related to sport and activity. Results: Among the 506 (84%) players included, 123 players (24.3%) reported groin pain. Overall, soccer players reported the highest groin pain prevalence (32.5%) followed by futsal (25.5%), basketball (25.2%), water polo (17.6%) and volleyball players (13.6%). Professional soccer, futsal and basketball athletes showed higher groin pain prevalence in comparison with non-professional athletes (p = 0.02, p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively). The mean time loss from sport due to groin pain was 60.3 ± 66 days in soccer, 41.1 ± 16.6 days in futsal, 31.5 ± 18 days in water polo, 37.2 ± 14.2 days in basketball and 50.8 ± 24.6 days in volleyball. Significantly lower HAGOS values were found in athletes with groin pain for all sports evaluated compared to athletes with no groin pain history (p = 0.0001). Longer time loss from sport was correlated with lower HAGOS values in soccer (p = 0.002) and futsal (p = 0.002) players with groin pain. Concomitant injuries were correlated with lower HAGOS values in water polo players (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Seasonal groin pain occurs in as many as one in four team sport athletes. Soccer players show the highest groin pain prevalence and the longest time loss from sport. Professional athletes report higher prevalence of groin pain in comparison with non-professional athletes. HAGOS appears to be a valid outcome instrument to measure groin pain, correlating with both time loss from sport and concomitant injuries in athletes. Level of evidence: Level IV.
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4860510
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