Notwithstanding the increased interest in wild edible plants, little is known on how some domestic thermal processes can affect their content. The aim of this study was to investigate the amounts of minerals, B1 and B2 vitamins, tocols, and carotenoids in raw, boiled, and steamed wild edible plants, namely, Sonchus asper (L.) Hill s.l., Sonchus oleraceus L., Cichorium intybus L., and Beta vulgaris L. var cicla. All vegetables were confirmed as high sources of lutein (from 6 to 9 mg/100 g) and β-carotene (from 2 to 5 mg/100 g). Quite high amounts of violaxanthin and neoxanthin were found. Alfa-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol were the main tocols, with same contents in raw and processed vegetables (about 2.5 mg/100 g). The most abundant macro element and trace element were, respectively, potassium and iron. B1 and B2 vitamins were found in low amounts in almost all plants, with the exception of thiamine in Beta vulgaris (about 1.6 mg/100 g). Boiling led to a significant loss of minerals (up to 60%) and B-group vitamins (up to 100%), while, among carotenoids, it only affected violaxanthin levels (up to 90%). Steamed vegetables showed only a slight reduction, about 20%, in β-carotene and lutein, with a marked decrease in violaxanthin and neoxanthin. One hundred grams of all fresh and cooked plants can be claimed as a source of vitamin A and E.

Evaluation of the Content of Minerals, B-Group Vitamins, Tocols, and Carotenoids in Raw and In-House Cooked Wild Edible Plants

Albanese, Donatella;Malvano, Francesca;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Notwithstanding the increased interest in wild edible plants, little is known on how some domestic thermal processes can affect their content. The aim of this study was to investigate the amounts of minerals, B1 and B2 vitamins, tocols, and carotenoids in raw, boiled, and steamed wild edible plants, namely, Sonchus asper (L.) Hill s.l., Sonchus oleraceus L., Cichorium intybus L., and Beta vulgaris L. var cicla. All vegetables were confirmed as high sources of lutein (from 6 to 9 mg/100 g) and β-carotene (from 2 to 5 mg/100 g). Quite high amounts of violaxanthin and neoxanthin were found. Alfa-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol were the main tocols, with same contents in raw and processed vegetables (about 2.5 mg/100 g). The most abundant macro element and trace element were, respectively, potassium and iron. B1 and B2 vitamins were found in low amounts in almost all plants, with the exception of thiamine in Beta vulgaris (about 1.6 mg/100 g). Boiling led to a significant loss of minerals (up to 60%) and B-group vitamins (up to 100%), while, among carotenoids, it only affected violaxanthin levels (up to 90%). Steamed vegetables showed only a slight reduction, about 20%, in β-carotene and lutein, with a marked decrease in violaxanthin and neoxanthin. One hundred grams of all fresh and cooked plants can be claimed as a source of vitamin A and E.
2024
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11386/4855440
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